Category Archives: Lawn Care

Florida Pest Control Reviews of Hulett Environmental services via Yelp

FloridaPestControlReviews“They inspected our home and showed us the termite damage.  We needed the traditional tenting, not the tentless method.  Theyare very professional about their work, and explain everything they do. We will now follow up with the bi-monthly pest control service for maintenance.  Jonadab, who will be doing this for us, is very thorough and, again, explains everything he does.”

  • Carefully inspect the perimeter of the home for mud tubes (used by termites to reach a food source), cracked or bubbling paint and rotting wood.
  • Repair fascia, soffits and rotted roof shingles. Some termites are drawn to deteriorating wood.
  • Keep basements, attics and crawl spaces well ventilated and dry.
  • Maintain a one-inch gap between soil and wood portions of the home.
  • Store firewood at least 20 feet away from the house and 5 inches up off the ground, and inspect it closely before bringing it indoors.
  • Divert water away from the property through properly functioning downspouts, gutters and splash blocks.

Studying bugs on a body can help solve murders

As it turns out insects can tell you a lot more then you might initially believe.  It is known as forensic entomology and it is helping detectives solve murders.  By studying the kind of bugs that are on a body a investigator can learn a number of things to help them solve the crime.

From time of death, to cause of death, and other information bugs can be a real clue to helping police crack a case wide open. To learn more how bugs are helping solve mysteries check out: Studying bugs on a body can help solve murders, students in Hunterdon learn

DNA analysis reveals butterfly and moth evolutionary relationship

DNA analysis reveals butterfly and moth evolutionary relationship

(Phys.org) —A pair of researchers with the Florida Museum of Natural History at the University of Florida has conducted a through genetic analysis of butterflies and moths and in the process has revealed some of their evolutionary history. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Akito Kawahara and Jesse Breinholt describe the DNA analysis they undertook of the insects and the results they found in doing so.

Butterflies and moths are among the most cherished of insects, the researchers note, due to their beauty and relationship to equally lovely flowers. All told there are approximately 160,000 known species of the insect, though many more have not been identified—some scientists suggest there could be half a million. Despite their widespread popularity, the evolutionary relationship between the two (moths and butterflies) has been difficult to estimate—very few fossils exist due to their extremely fragile body and wing structures and the lack of thorough DNA studies. In this new effort, the team in Florida set out to more firmly establish the evolutionary tree of the wispy creatures.

The two researchers sequenced almost 3000 genes creating in the process a dataset that included 46 taxa that combined 33 new transcriptomes with 13 genomes, expressed sequence tags and transcriptomes. They used a technique known as HaMStR (a next-generation sequencing approach) to identify 2,696 genes for inclusion into their phylogenomic analysis.

Their study showed that butterflies all share a single common ancestor and give credence to the theory that butterflies are more closely related to very small (micro) moths, rather than those of larger species, contradicting previous studies that had found the opposite to be true. More specifically, they found evidence that suggests plume and geometroid moths are likely the first relatives of butterflies. Also, the research showed that insects known as hedylids, commonly known as butterfly-moths are in fact true butterflies, not moths at all.

The overall result of the work was what the duo describe as the “first robust, transcriptome-based tree of Lepidoptera”—one that strongly contradicts the placement of butterflies in the historical context. It also provides an evolutionary framework, they note, for future research efforts—be they developmental, genomic, or ecological—for both butterflies and moths.

More information: Phylogenomics provides strong evidence for relationships of butterflies and moths, Proceedings of the Royal Society B, rspb.royalsocietypublishing.or… nt/281/1788/20140970

AbstractButterflies and moths constitute some of the most popular and charismatic insects. Lepidoptera include approximately 160 000 described species, many of which are important model organisms. Previous studies on the evolution of Lepidoptera did not confidently place butterflies, and many relationships among superfamilies in the megadiverse clade Ditrysia remain largely uncertain. We generated a molecular dataset with 46 taxa, combining 33 new transcriptomes with 13 available genomes, transcriptomes and expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Using HaMStR with a Lepidoptera-specific core-orthologue set of single copy loci, we identified 2696 genes for inclusion into the phylogenomic analysis. Nucleotides and amino acids of the all-gene, all-taxon dataset yielded nearly identical, well-supported trees. Monophyly of butterflies (Papilionoidea) was strongly supported, and the group included skippers (Hesperiidae) and the enigmatic butterfly–moths (Hedylidae). Butterflies were placed sister to the remaining obtectomeran Lepidoptera, and the latter was grouped with greater than or equal to 87% bootstrap support. Establishing confident relationships among the four most diverse macroheteroceran superfamilies was previously challenging, but we recovered 100% bootstrap support for the following relationships: ((Geometroidea, Noctuoidea), (Bombycoidea, Lasiocampoidea)). We present the first robust, transcriptome-based tree of Lepidoptera that strongly contradicts historical placement of butterflies, and provide an evolutionary framework for genomic, developmental and ecological studies on this diverse insect order.

Beware of the Stings This Summer

Beware of the Stings This Summer

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Hulett Environmental Services profiles the most dangerous summer stingers

The summer season is a time to enjoy the sunshine and the great outdoors, but it’s also the time when stinging insects can make an appearance at picnics, cookouts and pool parties. Hulett Environmental, a pest management company servicing South Florida warns that yellowjackets, wasps, hornets and other common stinging insects can pose an increased threat to one’s health. In fact, they send more than half a million people to the emergency room every year, according to the National Pest Management Association.

From painful stings to severe allergic reactions, stinging insects can put a damper on summer fun.  Whether you plan to fire up the grill, go to the playground or relax by the pool this summer, it’s important to be aware of the risks posed by certain stinging insects.

Below are the most common stingers people might encounter during the summer months.

Yellowjackets – Yellowjackets are distinguished by the black and yellow color pattern banded across their abdomens. They are territorial and may sting repeatedly if threatened.

European Hornets – European hornets are active at night. They have smooth stingers that carry venom known to cause itching, swelling and pain for about 24 hours. Like yellowjackets and wasps, European hornets can sting repeatedly during an attack.

Paper Wasps – Paper wasps are not an aggressive species by nature, but they will sting if their nest is threatened. Wasp stings are painful and can cause the same risk of allergic reaction as other insect stings.

Killer Bees – Africanized “killer” bees defend their colony and will attack in large numbers when threatened. However, they can only sting once as their stingers are barbed and tear off when trying to get away. Killer bees have been known to chase people for more than a quarter mile.

The best way to prevent an unwanted encounter is to exercise caution when outdoors. If you come in contact with a bee or wasp, do not swat it, as that may actually provoke an attack. Remain calm and the insect should fly away without causing harm.

For more information on stinging insects, visit www.bugs.com

Hulett Environmental Services shares tips on how to keep pests from disrupting Summer picnics or BBQs

Hulett Environmental Services, an organization committed to the protection of public health, food and property from household pests, offers these tips to help pests from ruining your summer gathering:

  • Prior to the party, check screen doors and repair any holes.
  • Remove sources of standing water in your yard, including birdbaths, wading pools or garden ponds.
  • Have insect repellant containing an EPA-registered active ingredient like DEET or Picaridin available for you and your guests.
  • Adorn your deck or patio with citronella candles that can help minimize the presence of mosquitoes.
  • With guests coming in and out of your house, make sure the doors close behind them.
  • Plan to serve food and beverages indoors, and reserve outdoor space for eating and entertaining.
  • Keep food sealed in containers whenever possible, and wipe tabletops frequently.
  • Clean trash, spills and crumbs immediately from tables and other surfaces.
  • Bring utensils and dishware indoors shortly after the meal.
  • Rinse all beverage bottles and cans, and dispose of them in tightly closed garbage containers.

If pests become intolerable, you may have a larger problem and need professional assistance. Sometimes, pest pressure can get out of hand. For example, if homeowners notice large mounds of ants or stinging insect nests around the property, they’ll want to contact a professional to help them safely remove these infestations as they can be a threat to our safety. Just Call HULETT!

Florida Pest Control Reviews of Hulett Environmental services via Yelp

Florida Pest Control Reviews of Hulett Environmental services via Yelp:

FloridaPestControlReviews“They inspected our home and showed us the termite damage.  We needed the traditional tenting, not the tentless method.  Theyare very professional about their work, and explain everything they do. We will now follow up with the bi-monthly pest control service for maintenance.  Jonadab, who will be doing this for us, is very thorough and, again, explains everything he does.”

 

  • Carefully inspect the perimeter of the home for mud tubes (used by termites to reach a food source), cracked or bubbling paint and rotting wood.
  • Repair fascia, soffits and rotted roof shingles. Some termites are drawn to deteriorating wood.
  • Keep basements, attics and crawl spaces well ventilated and dry.
  • Maintain a one-inch gap between soil and wood portions of the home.
  • Store firewood at least 20 feet away from the house and 5 inches up off the ground, and inspect it closely before bringing it indoors.
  • Divert water away from the property through properly functioning downspouts, gutters and splash blocks.

Just Call Hulett! South Florida Pest, Termite, and Lawn Care Services

Part of the 2012 television campaign for Hulett Environmental Services.

A lush green landscape can be a sense of pride for you and your family, while also adding value to your home. Hulett Environmental Services offers a full array of lawn pest, plant disease, weed control, and specialized fertilization services to meet your landscape’s specific needs.

We will provide you with a level of service that is backed by over 40 years of local experience and enhanced by our ongoing training that keeps all of our technicians on the leading edge of the pest control industry of South Florida.

https://www.bugs.com/lawn_care_servic…