Category Archives: Spider Pest Control

How to get rid of spiders in the house and stay safe from bites.

How to get rid of spiders in the house and stay safe from bites.

Spider Control for HomeownersFear of spiders is consistently ranked as one of the top phobias in America. Whether it is an evolutionary trigger that kept our ancestors alive or the result of Hollywood horror films, spiders have a reputation as being creepy, crawly, venomous pests.

But spiders aren’t all bad. They do provide a form of natural pest control by catching insects in their webs. However, that doesn’t mean they have an open invitation to come into our homes. A spider infestation can cause contamination of food in kitchens or pantries, and depending on the species, there could be health risks if family members unexpectedly happen upon a web or lurking spider. Taking action to prevent spiders goes a long way in avoiding these risks.

Keep garages, attics and basements clean and clutter-free.

Most spiders seek out secluded, undisturbed areas where they can build a web to catch their next meal, so an attic or basement that has been left unused over the past season could be harboring these pests out of sight. Avoid leaving clothing and shoes on the floor and consider storing them inside plastic containers. It is also advised to shake out all clothing that has been in a hamper before wearing or washing.

Seal any cracks or crevices around the home.

Spiders can crawl into homes through damaged window screens or cracks in the siding. The outside of homes should be inspected for these defects seasonally as weather and changes in temperature can cause or worsen existing problems.

Inspect items such as boxes of decorations and grocery bags before bringing them indoors.

Packages are often left on the front step if delivered when you’re not at home, and groceries might be placed on the driveway while unloading. These are opportunities for spiders and other pests to crawl onto bags and boxes and be carried inside. Inspecting packages before bringing them into your home reduces this risk.

If a spider bites you, contact your primary care physician for medical advice.

Species such as house spiders and cellar spiders pose no health threat to people. They don’t have very strong mouthparts, so if they tried to bite, they wouldn’t be able to pierce the skin. These spiders are simply nuisance pests, but they are much better off living and laying eggs outside.

Other species such as black widow spiders and brown recluse spiders do have the ability to pierce the skin and inject venom. Their bites cause varied reactions in people, but are very rarely fatal with proper treatment. Symptoms include localized pain, fever and nausea. In the case of a brown recluse spider bite, there’s also a possibility for skin necrosis at the site of the bite.

If you have an infestation in your home, contact a licensed pest professional.

Being proactive about spider control will reduce the likelihood of any species making a home in your abode and possibly harming a member of your family. But if you suspect you have a spider infestation in your home, contact a pest professional to identify the species and properly remove the pests.

 

Spiders use electricity for catching prey

Anyone can tell you that spiders are able to trap their meals in their sticky silky webs – but there’s a bit more to it than that. Spiders are actually able to conduct electricity across the surface of the web, which attracts the potential prey. The research was led by Fritz Vollrath of Oxford University and was published in the journal Naturwissenschaften.

 

Spider Prevention Tips from Hulett Environmental Services

Homeowners should be on the lookout for the following spider species:

Common House Spider: These spiders don’t pose a health risk, but they can be quite a nuisance throughout the house. They spin a tangled web in upper corners, angles of window frames and around furniture.

Brown Recluse Spider: The bite from a brown recluse can cause a very painful ulcer. These spiders can be found in many undisturbed areas around the home, such as inside boxes, under furniture and in seldom-used clothing or shoes.

Black Widow Spider: Probably the most infamous species of spider, the black widow’s venom can have serious side effects, especially in children and the elderly. Widows often build nests in cluttered areas within garages, attics and basements.

There are several ways to prevent spider bites and keep them out of the house all together:

  • Install screens and weather stripping on windows and door sweeps on doors.
  • Fix any cracks in siding and walls, especially where pipes or wires enter the home.
  • Store clothing and shoes inside plastic containers, and shake out all clothing that has been in a hamper, on the floor or in storage before wearing.
  • Wear heavy gloves when moving items that have been stored for a long period of time.
  • Inspect shoes before wearing them, as spiders often hide inside.
  • Reduce clutter in basements, garages and attics.
  • Store firewood at least 20 feet away from the house.

For more information on spiders and other common household pests, please visit www.bugs.com 

Spiders Can Catch and Devour Fish! Just Call HULETT

Give a spider a fish and it will feast for hours. Teach a spider to fish, however, and you are probably just wasting your time—it turns out many species are already more than proficient. Take for example this specimen from the voracious fishing spider family, Dolomedes, which has captured a pond fish in a garden near Brisbane, Australia.

View the full slideshow of fish eating spiders HERE

Credit: Spiders Can Catch and Devour Fish

Prevent Spiders

Hulett Environmental Services reminds homeowners that there are several ways to prevent spider bites and keep them out of the house all together:

  • Install screens and weather stripping on windows and door sweeps on doors.
  • Fix any cracks in siding and walls, especially where pipes or wires enter the home.
  • Store clothing and shoes inside plastic containers, and shake out all clothing that has been in a hamper, on the floor or in storage before wearing.
  • Wear heavy gloves when moving items that have been stored for a long period of time.
  • Inspect shoes before wearing them, as spiders often hide inside.
  • Reduce clutter in basements, garages and attics.
  • Store firewood at least 20 feet away from the house.

What to do if a spider bites you

What To Do

  • If you suspect a spider has bitten you, try to bring it with you to the doctor so they can determine the best course of treatment based on the species.
  • Clean the site of the spider bite well with soap and water.
  • Apply a cool compress over the spider bite location (using a cloth dampened with cold water or filled with ice).
  • If you suspect the bite is form a black widow or brown recluse spider, and the bite is on an extremity, elevate it.
  • Consider tying a snug bandage above the bite and elevate the limb to help slow or halt the venom’s spread. Ensure that the bandage is not so tight that it cuts off circulation in your arm or leg.
  • Adults can take aspirin or acetaminophen and antihistamines to relieve minor signs and symptoms (but use caution when giving aspirin to children or teenagers).
  • Seek medical attention for any severe signs and symptoms, or if signs and symptoms continue to worsen for more than 24 hours.

Earth’s Most Extreme Insects

Entomologists at the University of Florida scoured the literature to come up with a list of insects that were the coolest, fastest, largest, longest, loudest and brightest. They also chose more unusual champions: best imitator, least specific vertebrate bloodsucker and most spectacular mating just to name a few of them. Wired Science put together a list of 40 of their favorites, all which have their own allure to them: Earth’s Most Extreme Insects.

 

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