Category Archives: Spider Pest Control

Earth’s Most Extreme Insects

Entomologists at the University of Florida scoured the literature to come up with a list of insects that were the coolest, fastest, largest, longest, loudest and brightest. They also chose more unusual champions: best imitator, least specific vertebrate bloodsucker and most spectacular mating just to name a few of them. Wired Science put together a list of 40 of their favorites, all which have their own allure to them: Earth’s Most Extreme Insects.

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Brown recluse spiders in South Florida Make Annual inspections A Must

Brown recluse spiders have a characteristic dark brown violin marking on their back.

32_Brown Recluse Spider

Brown recluse spiders are nocturnal and eat other bugs like cockroaches and crickets. However you still don’t want them around.

The bite of the brown widow spider has been described as causing an initial pain comparable to the prick of a needle and leaves two red puncture marks (caused by the two fangs). This is followed by sharp pain which may lessen or persist for a number of hours. The pain moves from the site of the wound and settles in the abdomen and legs. Other neurological symptoms include nausea, vomiting, faintness, dizziness, tremors, loss of muscle tone, shock, speech disturbances, and general motor paralysis. However, death is rare.

Do you live in Florida and think that this spider may be invading your home? Hulett Environmental Services offers specialty pest control treatments designed to control and eliminate this pest!

Male brown recluse spiders wander farther than females and will crawl into shoes or other clothing.

Brown recluse spiders often live outdoors in debris and wood piles. They can be found indoors in storage areas and dark recesses. They are not a spider you want to encounter.

Like the black widow spider, the brown recluse spider bites in defense and does not bite humans instinctively. They will bite humans when the clothing they are hiding in is worn. The brown recluse spider bite is painful and can produce an open, ulcerating sore.

Brown recluse spiders in South Florida

Miami_SPider_Control

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Utilize these South Florida Spider Prevention Tips:

  • Install screens and weather stripping on windows and door sweeps on doors.
  • Fix any cracks in siding and walls, especially where pipes or wires enter the home.
  • Store clothing and shoes inside plastic containers, and shake out all clothing that has been in a hamper, on the floor or in storage before wearing.
  • Wear heavy gloves when moving items that have been stored for a long period of time.
  • Inspect shoes before wearing them, as spiders often hide inside.
  • Reduce clutter in basements, garages and attics.
  • Contact a Licensed Florida pest management professional as soon as you see spider activity inside your home
  • Get annual, free pest inspections

Identifying Your Spider Infestation: Is the Spider Venomous or Not?

Identifying Your Spider Infestation: Venomous or Not?

Most of us grab for the nearest newspaper as a weapon or call the bravest person in our household at the first sight of a spider. Forget about identifying whether it’s dangerous or not – many homeowners simply ask, “how can I kill it?”

Identifying Your Spider Infestation

With about 3,000 spider species roaming around North America, a few are bound to end up in our homes more often than not. However only a few of those pose any actual health dangers to humans – namely the brown recluse spider, the black widow spider and the hobo spider.

Although most spiders are nuisance pests, it is important homeowners familiarize themselves with these more dangerous species so they can protect themselves and their families and also be prepared to act if should be faced with one of these spiders in their home.

The Brown Recluse

Often identified by a dark brown violin shape on its back, the brown recluse spider is predominantly found in the Midwest and Southeast of the United States. This species is well known for its “secretive” behaviors, as it prefers to take residence in warm, dry and dark environments, such as woodpiles, basements and closets.

This arachnid bites, usually unintentionally when it feels trapped, typically when a hand or foot reaches into a shoe or piece of clothing or a box in the attic or basement where a brown recluse has made its home.  Because their bites can take three or more hours to develop and about three weeks to heal, it is important to keep an eye on the individual which was bitten.  The brown recluse venom can cause severe allergic reactions, notably in children, the elderly or those with preexisting medical conditions.

The Black Widow

Perhaps no spider is more notorious than the black widow. From their ominous appearance to the purported, but untrue, claim that the females devour the males after mating, these spiders are quite feared.

Black widows are found throughout the United States, but are most common in the southern and western states. These spiders are often found around wood piles and gain entry into a structure when firewood is carried into a building. They are also found under eaves, in boxes, and other areas where they are undisturbed. They bite when they are threatened.

Like the brown recluse, the black widow has a distinct pattern allowing for easy identification – a black body with red “hourglass” coloration on the underside of its abdomen.  The black widow venom contains a neurotoxin, which causes immediate pain at the bite site and then spreads to other areas of the body such as the chest and the abdomen. They also leave two puncture marks on the skin. Young children and the elderly are especially susceptible to severe reactions to black widow bites.

Hobo Spiders

The hobo spider is found throughout the Pacific Northwest and can be identified by its distinct pattern of yellow markings on its abdomen. These spiders build their webs in holes, cracks and recesses, and like most spiders, can be found in hiding places such as window wells and stacks of firewood, storage items, behind furniture and in closets.

As hobo spiders are much more likely to attack if provoked or threatened, people who live in areas where this spider is found should be aware of their habits to prevent and detect infestations before they become a problem.  Unlike the other spiders profiled here, the bite of a hobo spider may go unnoticed at first, but then a moderate to severe, slow-healing wound will develop.

NPMA offers the following tips to help prevent contact with spiders:

  • Avoid keeping clothing and shoes on the floor, especially if in an area known for spiders; consider storing inside plastic containers.
  • Seal cracks and crevices around the home.
  • Vacuum/sweep away webs in and around the home.
  • Shake out all clothing that has been in the laundry basket before wearing/washing.
  • Keep garages, attics and basements clean and clutter free.
  • If a spider bites you, contact your primary care physician for medical advice.
  • If you have an infestation in your home, contact a licensed pest professional to inspect and treat the pest problem.

Hulett Environmental informs homeowners of common household spiders

Be Aware of Spiders This Fall

Hulett Environmental informs homeowners of common household spiders

 Any eight-legged pest is sure to be unwelcome in homes, but not all creepy-crawlers are the same. While some species of spiders are nothing more than a nuisance, others can pose serious health risks when they bite. Hulett Environmental,  a pest management company servicing South Florida, urges homeowners to brush up on the types of spiders they could encounter this fall.

Homeowners should be on the lookout for the following spider species:

Common House Spider: These spiders don’t pose a health risk, but they can be quite a nuisance throughout the house. They spin a tangled web in upper corners, angles of window frames and around furniture.

Brown Recluse Spider: The bite from a brown recluse can cause a very painful ulcer. These spiders can be found in many undisturbed areas around the home, such as inside boxes, under furniture and in seldom-used clothing or shoes.

Black Widow Spider: Probably the most infamous species of spider, the black widow’s venom can have serious side effects, especially in children and the elderly. Widows often build nests in cluttered areas within garages, attics and basements.

Hulett Environmental  reminds homeowners that there are several ways to prevent spider bites and keep them out of the house all together:

  • Install screens and weather stripping on windows and door sweeps on doors.
  • Fix any cracks in siding and walls, especially where pipes or wires enter the home.
  • Store clothing and shoes inside plastic containers, and shake out all clothing that has been in a hamper, on the floor or in storage before wearing.
  • Wear heavy gloves when moving items that have been stored for a long period of time.
  • Inspect shoes before wearing them, as spiders often hide inside.
  • Reduce clutter in basements, garages and attics.
  • Store firewood at least 20 feet away from the house.

 

How can you prevent spider bites?

How can you prevent spider bites?

Florida Spider Control

  • Install screens and weather stripping on windows and door sweeps on doors.
  • Fix any cracks in siding and walls, especially where pipes or wires enter the home.
  • Store clothing and shoes inside plastic containers, and shake out all clothing that has been in a hamper, on the floor or in storage before wearing.
  • Wear heavy gloves when moving items that have been stored for a long period of time.
  • Inspect shoes before wearing them, as spiders often hide inside.
  • Reduce clutter in basements, garages and attics.
  • Store firewood at least 20 feet away from the house.

Tarantula Mating Season 2013


“This weekend or next weekend is going to be the biggest spider movement of all,” Al Wolf, director of the Sonoma County Reptile Rescue told CBS News Saturday. “All the males will be looking for the girls so it’s gonna be eight-legged love.”

Black Widow Spider Bites: Should I Worry?

More on black widows: http://www.pestworld.org/pest-guide/s…
Black widow spider bites are less common and more severe than other spider bites. Dr. Parada explains the symptoms in detail.

Hulett Environmental informs homeowners of common household spiders

Hulett Environmental informs homeowners of common household spiders

Any eight-legged pest is sure to be unwelcome in homes, but not all creepy-crawlers are the same. While some species of spiders are nothing more than a nuisance, others can pose serious health risks when they bite. Hulett Environmental, a pest management company servicing South Florida urges homeowners to brush up on the types of spiders they could encounter this fall.

When the cooler weather rolls in, spiders seek shelter in warm, dry environments like our homes. To protect the family, it is important to know what spiders are likely to be hiding indoors — in dark corners of our favorite rooms and even among the holiday decorations you’ll soon unpack that are stored in the basement.

Homeowners should be on the lookout for the following spider species:

Common House Spider: These spiders don’t pose a health risk, but they can be quite a nuisance throughout the house. They spin a tangled web in upper corners, angles of window frames and around furniture.

Brown Recluse Spider: The bite from a brown recluse can cause a very painful ulcer. These spiders can be found in many undisturbed areas around the home, such as inside boxes, under furniture and in seldom-used clothing or shoes.

Black Widow Spider: Probably the most infamous species of spider, the black widow’s venom can have serious side effects, especially in children and the elderly. Widows often build nests in cluttered areas within garages, attics and basements.

Hulett Environmental reminds homeowners that there are several ways to prevent spider bites and keep them out of the house all together:

  • Install screens and weather stripping on windows and door sweeps on doors.
  • Fix any cracks in siding and walls, especially where pipes or wires enter the home.
  • Store clothing and shoes inside plastic containers, and shake out all clothing that has been in a hamper, on the floor or in storage before wearing.
  • Wear heavy gloves when moving items that have been stored for a long period of time.
  • Inspect shoes before wearing them, as spiders often hide inside.
  • Reduce clutter in basements, garages and attics.
  • Store firewood at least 20 feet away from the house.