Tag Archives: bee control

Bee Safety What should you do and not do?

Bee Safety What should you do and not do?

Bee Removal Do’s and Don’ts:

DO check your property regularly for bee colonies. Honey bees nest in a wide variety of places, especially Africanized honey bees. Check animal burrows, water meter boxes, overturned flower pots, trees and shrubs.

DO keep pets and children indoors when using weed eaters, hedge clippers, tractor power mowers, chain saws, etc. Attacks frequently occur when a person is mowing the lawn or pruning shrubs and they inadvertently strike a bee’s nest.

DO avoid excessive motion when near a colony. Bees are much more likely to respond to an object in motion than a stationary one.

DON’T pen, tie or tether animals near bee hives or nests.

DON’T destroy bee colonies or hive, especially with pesticides. Honey bees are a vital link to U.S. agriculture. Each year, pollination by honey bees adds at least $10 billion to the value of more than 90 crops. They also produce about $150 million worth of honey each year.

DON’T remove bees yourself. If you want bees removed, look in the yellow pages under “bee removal” or “beekeepers”.

DON’T try to exterminate the bees yourself. Most people do not have the necessary safety equipment to remove bees. Past attempts of people trying to exterminate bees themselves have led to serious injury and death in some cases in the United States. This is extremely dangerous and you are advised to leave this to a professional exterminator.

What to do if you are attacked:

1. Run as quickly as you can away from the bees. Do not flail or swing your arms at them, as this may further annoy them.
2. Because bees target the head and eyes, cover your head as much as you can without slowing your escape.
3. Get to the shelter or closest house or car as quickly as possible. Don’t worry if a few bees become trapped in your home. If several bees follow you into your car, drive about a quarter of a mile and let the bees out of the car.

 Learn more about BEES

Guest post via Arizona Pest Control

Bee Swarm Unleashed in Pasco Garage

MyFOXTampaBay.com: Bee Swarm Unleashed in Pasco Garage


PORT RICHEY – A swarm of bees has been causing some big problems for a family in Port Richey. They made the discovery while cleaning out the garage and they’re having a devil of a time getting rid of them.

The Pizzuto’s certainly had a crazy start to their Thursday morning.  They were doing some spring cleaning in the garage, when suddenly, within minutes it was filled with hundreds of angry bees.

“They’re like swarming, there are millions of them,” said Selena Pizzuto, a 14-year-old, who caught the swarm in-motion on her cell phone camera.

The bees filled the garage, and covered the side door. Rose Pizzuto got a frantic call from her mother Mildred.

“And she said there were some bees moving around in the garage and she had been cleaning, and I came home and I thought, okay, we’ll just buy some spray,” Rose said.

She quickly found out she would need a lot more spray to fix the mess.

“We have bees, like everywhere!,” said her daughter in their home video.

It was a buzzing black cloud of bees, irritated because their nest had been disturbed by her mother’s cleaning.

“I couldn’t believe it, there were bees just swarming everywhere!,” Pizzuto said.

Worried for her kids, she called 911, who then put her in touch with an exterminator. But she didn’t have the extra $150 to pay for it.

“Were you freaking out?,” we asked.  “Yes, I was freaking out majorly!,” she said.  “It was very scary, I’ve never seen such a large swarm before.”

The nest was two shelves up from where she keeps frying pans they use every day. She never noticed the bees until now.  The good news is no one got stung. The bad news is, no matter how much they sprayed, more new bees kept showing up!

“Your neighbor sprayed a few, right?,” we asked. “Yes, my neighbor Michael sprayed the bees the first time,” said Pizzuto.  “And what happened after that?,” we asked. “After that he ran for it and then they all came out of the bees nest!,” said Pizzuto.

“I just saw like hundreds of bees everywhere,” said Selena Pizzuto. “Had you seen something like that before?,” we asked. “Never,” she said. “Like only on TV.”

“Then her looked out the window and her said, Mom, there’s a huge lot of bees out there,” said 5-year-old Ryan, who told us he was not scared of the swarm.

Ryan Willingham with the County Extension Office, who is a bee specialist, explained that we’re in bee season right now. And when hives get full, part of the worker bees branch out with a new queen to find a home.

“Half the workforce takes off and finds another place,” said Willingham.

We asked him if the family was in any danger?

“I wouldn’t necessarily classify it as dangerous, but yet, you don’t know where the bees are from,” said Willingham. “They need to be handled by a professional.”

And the Pizzutos still have lot of work to do. At the top of their downspout near the garage, we found another cluster of bees.  Willingham said that it could take several days to get rid of all the bees, from the garage, to the gutter, to another cluster we saw in the yard.

Man found dead in home, surrounded by 60,000 bees

Man found dead in home, surrounded by 60,000 bees

Miami resident was renovating house for daughter’s arrival

A Miami man was found dead in his house with his body surrounded by about 60,000 swarming bees, authorities said Sunday.

The 49-year-old man had been renovating a house that has been in his family for years, said Miami Fire Rescue spokesman Ignatius Carroll, Jr.

“We believe that he found a bee infestation in the walls and tried to exterminate them himself using store-bought foggers,” said Carroll.

On Saturday, his daughter and wife came to the house and couldn’t find him. Assuming he was out, they stayed on the ground floor and prepared dinner, a Miami Fire Rescue spokesman said. Later, they checked upstairs to see if he was sleeping and noticed a lot of bees in one of the rooms. Initially, they closed the room to prevent the bees from getting out, but later checked again and saw him lying on the floor, not responding and apparently having fallen from a chair.

“When police officers arrived, they could hear a humming noise, like the walls were alive,” Miami Police Cmdr. Delrish Moss told the Miami Herald. “Although we are awaiting the autopsy, and right now the death is considered unclassified, the fall likely had more to do with his death than anything to do with the bees.”

An autopsy proving the cause of the man’s death has not yet been performed, police said.

“His heart was there, but the effort was too much for him, especially on a limited budget,” brother Tim Mason told the Herald. “But he loved this home.”

A bee control expert was called in to remove the insects and advise authorities if special suits were needed. The expert said there were about 60,000 bees, the Herald reported.

More Info on Bees and Miami Bee Removal

Information on Bees

 

Looking for information on bees in Florida? You have found the right place on the web!  Stinging Florida bugs such as bees can not only be very irritating, but also very dangerous to those who are allergic to them.

Honey bees can produce a painful sting and usually do so in defense or if one of their nests has been disturbed. Unlike wasps, hornets, or the increasingly problematic Africanized Honey bee, honey bees are not easily provoked.

Bees will die after they sting, leaving their stinger and venom sacs attached, which continue to release venom until the sac is emptied or the stinger is removed.

A beehive functions as a miniature society; they contain three specialized groups or castes. The castes consist of workers, drones and queens, and each has their own specialized function. There is only one queen per hive, which is the largest bee, and her main function is laying eggs. A hive may contain as many as 40,000 worker bees, which are all sterile females, and tend to be the smallest. The males, or drones, can number up to 2,000, and make up the remainder of the hive.

The queen lays her eggs in a cell in a wax honeycomb, produced and shaped by the workers, which hatch into larvae. The worker bees feed pollen and honey to the newborn larva, which undergo several moltings before spinning a cocoon within the cell and pupating. After 16-24 days a full-grown bee emerges from the cell.

Besides nurturing and feeding the larvae, young worker bees also make wax, build the honeycomb, and clean and guard the hive. They also collect the nectar and pollen, which they store in “pollen baskets”, or corbicula, that grow on their hind legs for this purpose. After this, they begin building comb cells. They progress to other within-colony tasks as they become older, such as receiving nectar and pollen from foragers. Eventually a worker will leave the hive and typically spend the remainder of its life as a forager. Workers tend to have short life spans, usually several weeks, but a queen can live for several years.

Most bee species have historically been cultivated for honey and beeswax by humans; of the two species that have been domesticated, the honey bes has been used for its natural resources since the time of the building of the Egyptian pyramids. Worker bees cooperate to find food and incorporate a pattern of ‘dancing’ (known as the bee dance or waggle dance) to communicate with each other; this dance varies from species to species, but all living species of this unique Florida bug exhibit some form of this behavior.

Honeybees are primarily floral visitors, and pollinate a large variety of plants. Bees are basically the most important pollinators of native plants in Florida. Other insects such as butterflies, moths, beetles, as well as birds, contribute to plant pollination as well, ensuring the reproductive success of native plants. Of all the honey bee species, the aforementioned Apis mellifera has been used extensively for commercial pollination of crops and other plants; the value of these pollination services is commonly measured in the billions of dollars.

Do you live in Florida and have a bee problem in or near your home or business? Hulett Environmental Services offers custom designed pest control treatments to control and prevent these pests!