Tag Archives: Florida Exterminator

Kid’s Corner

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What questions should homeowners ask during a professional termite treatment?

What questions should homeowners ask during a professional termite treatment?

Homeowners should find out specifics about the location and extent of termite damage.  They should ask for further information on the products and materials that will be applied in and around their home.  A federal law requires commercial applicators of “restricted use” products to be certified. The certification program is left up to the state. Homeowners can call the certifying state agencies for further information.  They should also be aware of the difference between a repair and a retreat contract which stipulates a company’s ultimate responsibility for the job.

Homeowners shouldn’t hesitate to question their pest control operators about other pests or related pest information.  PCOs are well-trained, educated and capable of discussing pests and pest-related public health and property threats. As consumers become increasing aware of and worried about the recent influx of pest-related public health threats they should feel free to contact NPMA or their local PCO to address any issues.

Florida Pest Control

ENJOY YOUR SUMMER PEST FREE

ENJOY YOUR SUMMER PEST FREE

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Rather than enjoying backyard barbeques, poolside picnics and other outdoor summer sun activities, homeowners are being chased indoors as summer pests put a stinger in summer fun

A 2005 study by the National Pest Management Association (NPMA) found that summer is the greatest season of concern for pests among homeowners. Hulett Environmental recommends several tips to help homeowners take back their weekends and alleviate the problems of summer pests.

  • Eliminate standing water and other sources of moisture in or around the home.
  • Keep tree branches and other plants cut back from the house.
  • Make sure that there are no cracks or small openings around the house.
  • Make sure that firewood and building materials are not stored next to the home.
  • Move food indoors or under screened tents during outdoor gatherings.
  • Check yourself and your pets regularly for ticks.

To learn more about common summer pests and tips to prevent them visit www.bugs.com

Pest Control Fort Lauderdale FL | Call 954-797-7221

Pest Control Fort Lauderdale FL | Call 954-797-7221

Hulett Environmental encourages public awareness about insects of foreign origin

Hulett Environmental  encourages public awareness about insects of foreign origin

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Invasive species, or insects of foreign origin, can cause major issues for American homeowners during the summer months. Hulett Environmental,  a pest management company servicing  South Florida, urges vigilance against invasive species including red imported fire ants (RIFAs), Asian tiger mosquitoes, brown marmorated stink bugs and Formosan termites as the weather continues to warm.

Most people are aware of the risks posed by common summer pests like ticks, mosquitoes and bees. However, invasive species can also cause property damage and, in some cases, injury to humans.

Experts at the National Pest Management Association (NPMA), a nonprofit organization committed to the protection of public health, food and property from household pests, encourage homeowners to also be on the lookout for the following invasive species this summer:

Red Imported Fire Ant (RIFA) – RIFAs were brought to the United States in 1930 from South America and are mainly found in the southern region of the country. When disturbed, they are known to swarm and sting humans, often causing painful welts on the skin.

Asian Tiger Mosquito – Originating from Southeast Asia, the Asian tiger mosquito is now found throughout the eastern, Midwestern and southern states. This mosquito species can cause an irritable bite and spread several diseases, including Dengue fever, West Nile virus and Japanese Encephalitis.

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug – Likely introduced from Eastern Asia, stink bugs are most prevalent in the northeast. While stink bugs don’t pose any health threats, they can produce an unpleasant odor when crushed.

Formosan Termite – Originally from China, Formosan termites are the most aggressive subterranean termite species. They are capable of consuming wood at rapid speeds, posing a serious structural threat to a property if left untreated.

Due to the health and property risks posed by invasive species, homeowners should frequently inspect the home for signs of an infestation and contact a licensed pest professional to treat any potential pest problems.

For more information on invasive pests, please visit www.bugs.com

Six-Legged Giant Finds Secret Hideaway, Hides For 80 Years

A 12-centimeter-long stick insect that hadn’t been seen for 80 years was rediscovered in 2001. Only 24 individuals remained, so conservation became vitally important.

Today, there are over 9,000 of the stick insects, thanks to the conservation efforts at the Melbourne Zoo. However, they are still considered critically endangered by the IUCN.

More info: http://n.pr/17tGPm1

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Bug Database

Bug Database

If you have not had the opportunity to explore our bug database you don’t know what you’re missing! We have one of the most comprehensive and elaborate database of bugs across the entire web. If you can’t find your bug in our database you can always upload a picture to our Ask the Experts section on our website and we will tell you what it is you’re dealing with.

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2 Newfound Wasps Parasitize Ant-Eating Spiders

Two new species of parasitic wasp have been identified in Portugal, and both parasitize the same species of spider.

The spider Zodarion styliferum belongs to the largest genus of ant-eating spiders, just one of over 100 species. It spends the day sleeping, only emerging at night to hunt its sole source of food. But it doesn’t sleep just anywhere – it builds itself an “igloo” using rocks and dead wood. This miniature house may protect it against a harsh environment or predators, but it’s no defence against the parastoid wasps Calymmochilus dispar and Gelis apterus.

Unfortunately for juvenile Z. styliferum, the wasps are perfectly evolved to negate the walls. When the spider is sleeping during the day, they push their narrow ovipositors (seen coiled beneath the wasp’s abdomen) through the cracks and gaps of its shelter. The wasps lay their eggs on the juvenile (at some point, it is immobilised) and feed on it.

But it’s not only the food source the wasps end up with – they get a nice home to pupate in. The wasps differ in their metamorphoses; while G. apterus spins itself a cocoon before pupating, C. dispar does not. It seems a tragic irony that while the spider’s house cannot protect it against the wasps, it does an excellent job of protecting the wasps themselves.

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To read the paper: http://bit.ly/XjMl1U

Photo: Female G. apterus. Credit to Stanislav Korenko.

http://www.livescience.com/26826-wasps-parasitize-spiders.html

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130204102432.htm