Tag Archives: Florida Exterminator

Don’t forget! Only a few more days left to submit your entries to the Show Us Your Scream contest!

Don’t forget! Only a few more days left to submit your entries to the Show Us Your Scream contest!

NPMA Launches “Show Us Your Scream” Contest

Show us your scream large

If you are like me (and like most others), you undoubtedly have your own pest-phobia. Well, instead of living with that little secret, you can now tell the world about it with NPMA’s Show Us Your Scream Contest!

We (NPMA) wants pest-phobes to join together and take comfort in our unity. We want to show that it’s okay to be fearful of pests. We want to capture the most harrowing, crazy, grossed-out reactions people have when they think about a pest crawling across the floor (or on the dinner table or in the bathtub or even across the bed).

Have you got a great scream inside you? Can your family show us a guttural reaction to creepy-crawlies? You will find all the details of the Show Us Your Scream Contest here. Show us what you’ve got! The winning entry will get to scream again – but this time for fun – with an all expense paid trip to an amusement park!

Just Call HULETT!

WashingtonPost.com: Pesky, Flying Bugs Take Over Olympic Stadium

LONDON (The Associated Press) – There’s a bug problem at the Olympic Stadium.

Thousands, if not hundreds of thousands, of bugs descended on the stadium Wednesday evening. They caused a nuisance for fans, stadium workers and maybe even track and field athletes.

Olympic workers say the bugs are flying ants that, while pesky, are harmless.

With almost no wind swirling in the 80,000-seat stadium, the bugs are everywhere and show no signs of relenting.

Fans in every direction could be seen swatting the small creatures away.

Florida Pet Control

Hulett Environmental reminds people to take extra precautions to guard against stinging insects

Hulett Environmental reminds people to take extra precautions to guard against stinging insects

The late summer and early fall are popular times for people to flock outdoors to enjoy the summer sun. Unfortunately, it is also the most active and aggressive season for stinging insects including wasps and yellow jackets, warns Hulett Environmental Services a pest management company servicing Florida.

“Whether completing home maintenance projects or attending a holiday cookout, anyone spending time outside during the warmer months is likely to encounter stinging insects,” said Greg Rice, Marketing for Hulett Environmental Services “These pests are known to dole out painful stings, which can be life-threatening to people who have an allergic reaction.”

In fact, the National Pest Management Association, a nonprofit organization committed to the protection of public health, food and property from household pests, reports that stinging insects send more than half a million people to the emergency room every year.

“It is important that people don’t provoke stinging insects by swatting at them. Instead, they can take a few extra precautions to prevent an unwanted encounter with these pests,” added Rice. Experts at the NPMA and Hulett offer the following tips to avoid being stung:

  • Ensure all doors and windows in your home have screens that are in good condition.
  • When dining outside, keep food covered until ready to eat.
  • Remove garbage frequently and keep trashcans covered.
  • Wear shoes, especially in grassy areas.
  • Overseed grassy areas to get better coverage, as this will deter ground-nesting insects.
  • Paint/stain untreated wood.
  • Avoid wearing sweet-smelling perfumes.
  • Do not swat at a stinging insect as it increases the likelihood of an aggressive reaction.
  • Seek immediate medical attention if stung, as reactions can be severe.
  • Do not attempt to remove a hive or nest on your own.

For more information on stinging insects, visit www.bugs.com

Hulett Environmental Offers Advice on How to Keep Uninvited Insects Out of Your Backyard

Summer Barbeques Attract Unwelcome Pests

Florida Pet Control

Hulett Environmental Offers Advice on How to Keep Uninvited Insects Out of Your Backyard

According to research conducted by the National Pest Management Association in 2005, 67% of homeowners are most concerned about pests during the summer. Barbeque season begins when the temperature heats up, the same time that insects become the most active.  These prevalent summer pests can cause painful stings and carry diseases, as well as becoming a nuisance for you and your guests.

If ants, mosquitoes and wasps aren’t on the guest list for your barbeque this summer, the National Pest Management Association recommends taking these precautions to discourage those unwanted pests from attending:

  • Ants are attracted to typical barbeque fare.  Plan to serve food and beverages indoors, and reserve outdoor space for eating and entertaining.  Keep food sealed in containers whenever possible, and wipe tabletops frequently. Bring utensils and dishware indoors shortly after the meal.  Rinse all beverage bottles and cans, and dispose of them in tightly closed garbage containers.
  • Mosquitoes feed on blood, causing painful bite marks and carrying diseases such as Malaria, Yellow Fever, and Encephalitis.  Remove or drain any sources of standing water in your yard that could be a breeding ground for mosquitoes, including birdbaths, wading pools, or garden ponds.  When outside, wear insect repellent on exposed skin to prevent mosquito bites.
  • Wasp stings can be painful and even send guests with allergies to the emergency room.  Avoid decorating with fragrant candles or planting fragrant flowers that may attract wasps.
  • Ensure all doors and windows in your home have mesh screens that are in good condition, and keep doors closed when possible so pests cannot enter your home.
  • If you’re still concerned about an abundance of pests in your yard, contact Hulett Environmental to help control the problem.  A pest professional can identify, treat and remove pest-breeding grounds, allowing your guests to enjoy their hamburgers and hot dogs in comfort.

For more information on summer pests, visit www.pestworld.org and  www.bugs.com

Everyday Bed Bug Prevention Tips

Everyday Bed Bug Prevention Tips

It is important to be aware of ways to prevent bed bugs in your everyday life. Here are some tips to keep in mind:

  • Vacuum suitcases after returning from a vacation.
  • Check your sheets for tell-tale blood spots.
  • Consider bringing a large plastic trashbag to keep your suitcase in during hotel stays.
  • Carry a small flashlight to assist you with quick visual inspections.
  • Never bring second-hand furniture, especially mattresses and box springs, into a home without thoroughly examining for signs of a bed bug infestation. You might consider having a pest control professional inspect the furniture as it is difficult to detect an infestation without training.
  • Regularly inspect areas where pets sleep for signs of bed bugs.
  • Bed bugs are elusive creatures, so it is imperative to seek professional pest control assistance to address an infestation.

Pest World Contest

SUBMIT a photo or video of your reaction to seeing a bug for a chance to win an amusement park trip valued at $4,000! http://t.co/zcntpSYY via www.pestworld.org

Mitigating the Downside to Summer Fun

Mitigating the Downside to Summer Fun

Slide1Hurray – summer is finally here! This is a glorious time of long hours of sun and warmth, walks and hikes, swimming, camping and barbecues. There’s something for everyone in the great outdoors.

But sometimes, don’t you just wish the mosquitoes, bees and other pests would get the memo about being on vacation and just leave you alone? Unfortunately, we all know there are downsides to communing with nature and enjoying our summer fun.

So, let’s go over some of the more common summer insects, why we should be concerned about them and what we can do to mitigate the problem. Remember —especially when it comes to summer insects — an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

Bees, Hornets, Wasps and Yellowjackets

  • The upside: They pollinate plants and flowers and help give us fruits and vegetables. They also eat other harmful pests such as grubs and flies.
  • The downside: They dole out painful stings and give us anxiety about being stung. Unfortunately, millions of Americans are at risk for suffering severe allergic reactions.

Although typically a source of great anxiety for fear that they might sting you, in fact, bees and yellowjackets rarely do sting unless provoked. So, the number one rule is not to panic and swat at a bee when it comes for a visit. If it lands on your skin, just blow gently rather than smack at it. There are more aggressive species, particularly wasps that can sting in painful attacks if they feel threatened or you wander too close to their nest. While painful, most insect stings usually result in a limited local reaction, with pain and swelling. Unfortunately, about 3 percent of people have more widespread allergic reactions, with rash and hives. The most extreme cases of allergic reactions are called anaphylaxis and symptoms include tongue and throat swelling, wheezing, dizziness or even life threatening shortness of breath and drop in blood pressure. If these symptoms arise, call 911. If you are allergic to stinging insects you should know how to use an epinephrine kit and carry it with you at all times.

If stung and the stinger is still in place, first remove the stinger. Then clean the area with soap and cold water and apply ice. Benadryl and over-the-counter 1 percent hydrocortisone ointment may help calm the reaction. Consider taking a pain reliever as needed.

Mosquitoes

  • The upside: Is there one?
  • The downside: Mosquito bites are a common, insect-related reason parents seek medical help for their children. The local reactions and itchy lesions that are results of mosquito bites are no fun, but luckily, severe reactions are extremely uncommon.

Mosquitoes bite most intensely around dawn and dusk. If you must or want to be outside during those times, it’s best to be inside a screened-in porch or dressed in clothing that leaves very little exposed skin. Your best protection will be insect repellant, such as DEET or picaridin.

A mosquito bite typically results in a pink bump that itches. As tempting as it may be, don’t scratch it! Scratching only agitates the venom and increases your itching. In addition, over-scratching might cause breaks in the skin that can serve as a port of entry for bacterial superinfections. Although less common, some people can be more sensitive to mosquito bites and have more severe reactions, such as welts or hives. All bites should be washed with soap and cold water. Benadryl and over-the-counter 1 percent hydrocortisone cream may be indicated for intense itching and the larger reactions. If there are signs and symptoms of infection you may need to see your doctor for antibiotics.

Unfortunately, mosquitoes can leave more than a local reaction. Sometimes they may transmit infections like malaria, dengue, or West Nile Virus (WNV). Luckily, in the United States we rarely encounter malaria or dengue, but WNV has become widespread. The good news is that in most cases WNV is a mild and self-limited infection. Symptoms may be so light as to go unnoticed, or present as a “summer flu,” with mild body and headaches and low-grade fever. In rare and extreme cases WNV is a potentially life threatening infection. Symptoms include higher fever, head and body aches, confusion and worsening weakness and such symptoms should prompt you to seek medical attention.

Ticks

  • The upside: None.
  • The downside: The serious illness that ticks can transmit, such as Lyme Disease, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Babesia (“tick malaria”), amongst others.

Obviously, the best way to avoid ticks and their associated problems is to not pick them up in the first place, but that can be easier said than done. It’s a good idea to wear clothing that leaves less skin exposed that can act as a barrier to the ticks. So flip-flops, sandals, shorts and T-shirts are out when planning a hike to areas that are likely to have ticks. Wear boots and long socks, and remember to tuck your long pants into your socks when hiking. The best protection against ticks consists ofpermethrin-treated clothing and gear, combined with DEET applied to exposed skin.

Keep in mind that most ticks need to feed for hours before they can successfully transmit infections. So, it is very important that after hikes you do a full body check (including in the hair) to look for ticks. If removed promptly, the risk of infection decreases significantly.

If you do find a tick on your body or that of a family member or pet, it’s important to carefully remove the tick right away. Use fine-tipped tweezers to grasp the tick as close to the skin’s surface as possible. Pull upward with steady, even pressure. Don’t twist or jerk the tick as this can cause the mouth-parts to break off and remain in the skin. Avoid squashing the tick because spreading tick blood in the bite wound might increase the risk of infection. Once the tick is removed, clean the area with soap and water and perhaps an antiseptic. If you develop a rash, headaches, pains or fever, call your doctor immediately.

The lowdown on bug repellant

The good news is bug repellants really do work in deterring mosquitoes, ticks, biting flies, chiggers and other insects. The bad news is that they are ineffective against spiders and stinging insects, such as yellowjackets, wasps, bees or hornets.

The gold standard of insect repellant is DEET. It has been in use for more than 50 years and is recommended for use in persons above 2 months of age. The alternative repellant of choice is picaridin is also effective against mosquitoes, ticks, and sand flies.

Mosquito Season Is Here — How Bad Will it Get?

Mosquito Season Is Here — How Bad Will it Get?

FAIRFAX, Va., Jun 18, 2012 (BUSINESS WIRE) — Summer has barely begun but it’s likely many people have already encountered one of the season’s most ubiquitous pests — the mosquito. As is the case with many other insects, mosquitoes have made an early emergence after a mild winter and rainy spring. The National Pest Management Association (NPMA) warns that this might be one of the worst seasons yet, so break out the repellant.

“Mosquito season is highly dependent on rain events, and states are monitoring rainfall and pest management companies are applying treatments accordingly,” noted Missy Henriksen, vice president of public affairs for NPMA. “This summer, mosquito numbers have the potential to grow significantly and it’s important for people to take precautions to avoid exposure.”

Although mosquitoes are known to carry a variety of diseases, West Nile virus (WNV) is of most concern in the United States.

“In most cases West Nile Virus is a mild infection with symptoms so slight they can go unnoticed, or feel like a summer flu. In extreme cases, it can be a potentially life threatening infection with higher fever, head and body aches, worsening weakness, confusion and even coma. Anyone experiencing these symptoms should seek immediate medical attention,” advised Dr. Jorge Parada, medical spokesperson for the NPMA.

The NPMA offers the following tips to avoid becoming a mosquito meal:

– Eliminate areas of standing water around the home such as flowerpots, birdbaths, baby pools, grill covers and other objects where water collects. Mosquitoes need only about 1/2 inch of water to breed.

– Screen all windows and doors. Repair even the smallest tear or hole.

– Minimize outside activity between dusk and dawn, when mosquitoes are most active.

– If you must spend time outdoors during peak mosquito times, wear long pants and sleeves and use an insect repellant containing DEET, picaridin or oil of lemon-eucalyptus.

– If you are concerned about mosquito activity on your property, contact a pest management company or your local mosquito abatement district.

The NPMA, a non-profit organization with more than 7,000 members, was established in 1933 to support the pest management industry’s commitment to the protection of public health, food and property.

SOURCE: National Pest Management Association