Tag Archives: Florida Mosquito Control

Mosquito Control

Mosquito-borne illnesses continue to plague communities throughout the United States. With recent outbreaks of mosquito-borne illnesses in Florida, homeowners everywhere should take steps to protect their family.

Homeowners should consider employing a pest professional to help them control this pest.

As evidenced by the increasing incidence of West Nile Virus, mosquito infestations continue well into the year.

The National Pest Management Association and Hulett Environmental offer the following advice on keeping mosquitoes out of homes:

  • Eliminate potential mosquito breading grounds like birdbaths and baby pools by changing the water at least once per week.
  • Remove excess vegetation around any standing water sources that cannot be changed, dumped or removed.
  • Check your screens for any holes to keep them out of your house.

To learn more about mosquito-transmitted diseases, please visit www.pestworld.org and www.bugs.com

Flowers wilt. Candlelight fades. Roaches are forever.

Flowers wilt. Candlelight fades. Roaches are forever.

Can’t decide on what to get that special someone for Valentine’s Day? Sometimes the answer is all around us, and right where it’s been for millions of years—like cockroaches! How better to express your appreciation for that special someone than to name one of the Bronx Zoo’s 58,000 Madagascar hissing cockroach after them? Best of all, when you purchase this everlasting gift, you’ll help support the Wildlife Conservation Society and its five parks in New York City.

http://www.bronxzoo.com/roach/

West Nile Virus reported in Hernando County

West Nile Virus reported in Hernando County

Mosquito-borne illnesses continue to plague communities throughout the United States. With recent outbreaks of mosquito-borne illnesses in Florida, homeowners everywhere should take steps to protect their family.

As evidenced by the increasing incidence of West Nile Virus, mosquito infestations continue well into the fall months.

Hulett Environmental offers the following advice on keeping mosquitoes out of homes:

  • Eliminate potential mosquito breading grounds like birdbaths and baby pools by changing the water at least once per week.
  • Remove excess vegetation around any standing water sources that cannot be changed, dumped or removed.
  • Check your screens for any holes to keep them out of your house.

Florida Pet Control

To learn more about mosquito-transmitted diseases, please visit www.bugs.com.

Scientists are creating super soldier ants

Scientists are creating super soldier ants…a good idea?

Researchers and scientists from McGill University in Canada had discovered that the ant species Pheidole morrisi has all the tools needed to become a big headed monster. All the researchers had to do was dab an ant larvae with a hormone and like magic a regular worker ant became a super soldier. Pictured below. Read the full story on the Daily Mail.

VIa http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/01/06/article-2082799-0F59237D00000578-750_634x438.jpg

Do you think this is a good idea?

The inside scoop on occasional invaders

The inside scoop on occasional invaders

Florida Pet Control

Occasional invaders are pests that find their way into your home once in a while. They are typically looking for food, warmth, or just lost their way and stumbled into your home.  Traditionally they are not disease-spreading pests and will not cause any kind of structural damage to your property.

Ladybugs, boxelder bugs, spiders, and cluster flies are all examples of this type of pests.

The good news about occasional invaders is that once they are inside they don’t reproduce or feed, but are just a nuisance with their presence.  Some of these pests, like the ladybug, are actually beneficial pests! Remind yourself of this as you scoop them up from your windowsills during the winter months. Ladybugs feed on a wide range of insects making them a pest that you want to have around – just not INSIDE your home!

The best strategy for dealing with occasional invaders is preventing them from penetrating your home. However, once they are already inside, depending on your tolerance level you can remove small amounts of nuisance pests simply by vacuuming them up.  If there are too many pests inside or if you have a lower pest tolerance, a pest control professional will be able to assist you in controlling your infestation.  Just remember, if you vacuum them up you should remove the bag when finished. Seal it in a plastic bag and dispose of it with your normal garbage.

There are many steps homeowners can take to reduce the likelihood of occasional invaders:

  • Keep all kitchen areas clean (including floors) and free of useless clutter. Kitchen appliances should be kept free of spills and crumbs. Clean shelves regularly and store foods such as cereal, flour, and dog food in resealable containers.
  • Periodically sweep and vacuum floor areas in the kitchen, under furniture, and around dining areas.
  • Keep garbage areas clean. Garbage should be stored in sealed containers and disposed of regularly.
  • Seal cracks, crevices, and other gaps around doors and windows. Doors and windows should always be kept closed or well screened.
  • Check pipes and pipe areas around the house for leaks, cracks and gaps and seal and patch any problems if necessary. Leaky faucets should also be fixed.
  • Keep basements, attics, and crawl spaces well ventilated and dry. If you have mold and mildew in your home or office crawlspace, it’s a symptom of an excess moisture problem.
  • Inspect boxes, grocery bags and other packaging thoroughly. Insects have also been known to come in on potted plants and in luggage.

Just Call Hulett!

Win $3,000 For Your School!

Insects and animals are amazing and they are incredibly fun to learn about in the classroom. It’s when they come indoors—into our homes and schools— that they can become pests. Some pests are simply nuisances, while others including rodents, ants, termites, cockroaches, stinging insects and ticks can become dangerous health threats and destroy our property.

PestWorldForKids.org and the National Pest Management Association (NPMA) want to spread the word about the importance of protecting our health and property from household pests and we need your help! Using the Pest PSA lesson plan, students enrolled in grades 4-8 can create educational television public service announcements discussing the health risks posed by household pests.

Entries can focus on a single pest—i.e. cockroaches trigger asthma attacks, spread Salmonella and 33 different parasites, etc. Or, the TV PSA can focus on several pests such as rodents (contaminate food), mosquitoes (West Nile virus) and ticks (Lyme Disease). Videos can be up to 60 seconds in length.

Enter now for a chance to win $3,000 for your school!

Read the complete rules

Florida Mosquito Control ~ Just Call Hulett!

SW Fla. fighting mosquitoes, thanks to rainy Oct

The Associated Press

FORT MYERS, Fla. — A rainy October has mosquito control officers buzzing in southwest Florida.

Officials say they are experiencing the worst mosquito season in two decades, thanks to weather patterns that created the ‘perfect storm’ for the pesky insects.

Lee County Mosquito Control District spokeswoman Shelly Redovan says the region began the year under a drought. That provided salt marsh mosquitoes a greater area to lay their eggs. The rainy season resulted in lots of standing water, which compounds the mosquito problem. The result? Officials say they’re still seeing thousands of mosquitos nightly.

The Fort Myers News-Press ( http://newspr.es/rRRcmS) reports the district is using airplanes, helicopters and trucks to spray.

The newspaper reports that southwest Florida received 10.40 inches of rain in October. That’s 6.94 inches above the normal rainfall for the month.
Read more: http://www.miamiherald.com/2011/11/02/2483338/sw-fla-fighting-mosquitoes-thanks.html#ixzz1cb2DYIUo

A CLOSER LOOK: Mosquitoes

(Diptera: Culicidae)

Appearance:

Mosquitoes bite with their mouthparts and have scales on the back of their wings.

Size:

Approximately ½-inch long.

Behavior:

Mosquitoes have caused countless problems for man throughout history. In order to lay eggs, a female mosquito must feed on the blood of a human or animal. It can leave behind serious health threats such as viruses and other disease-causing pathogens.

Habitat:

Mosquitoes require as little as 2 inches of standing water to successfully breed. Mosquitoes that attack people in their own yard are usually breeding close by. Other mosquitoes, such as container breeders, do not seek out a natural body of water, but rather lay eggs in any container that is holding water (bird bath, tire, bucket, etc…). Tree hole mosquitoes, for example, lay their eggs in standing water that has accumulated inside of the hollows within trees.

Interesting Fact:

Mosquito-borne diseases, such as encephalitis and West Nile Virus, cause many deaths in developing countries.

Control:

Do you live in Florida and think that this pest may be invading your home or yard? Hulett Environmental Services offers specialty pest control treatments designed to control and eliminate this pest!

Mosquito Bred to Fight Dengue Fever Shows Promise in Study

Mosquito Bred to Fight Dengue Fever Shows Promise in Study

By Reg Gale

Oct. 31 (Bloomberg) — Scientists, attempting to halt Dengue fever, for the first time released mosquitoes into the wild that had been genetically modified to pass on deadly DNA that kills their offspring.

About 19,000 lab-altered

insects were released into 25 acres on Grand Cayman Island in 2009, according to a study, published yesterday in the journal Nature Biotechnology. Later tests showed they made up about 16 percent of the mosquito population and that the fatal gene was carried by about 10 percent of larvae. Scientists estimated the modified insects — all males — were about half as successful in mating as normal.

There are as many as 100 million cases of Dengue reported each year worldwide, making it one of the most medically significant viruses carried by mosquitoes, the report said. There’s no vaccine, boosting the need to limit the insects that carry it, the researchers said. The experiment, by scientists from closely held Oxitec Ltd., a biotechnology company based in Oxford, England, has spurred concern that there may be unintended environmental consequences.

“These data also allow us tentatively to estimate how many mosquitoes might need to be released in this area to suppress the target population,” the researchers said.

The use of genetically enhanced mosquitoes was discussed in a series of articles in the magazine Scientific American this month. In those articles, Helen Wallace, the director of GeneWatch UK, said she was concerned that the new form of insect would become part of a complex system involving predators and prey that scientists have no control over.

2010 Report

She cited a 2010 report by the European Food Safety Authority that raised the potential for illnesses to evolve into more dangerous forms and for other insects to move into the ecological niche created by the absence of mosquitoes.

In the report, the scientists said the percentage of successful couplings by the altered mosquitoes may have been limited because they didn’t fit easily into the insect social system, the physical effects of handling and distributing them or negative effects of the genetic changes on their performance.

Dengue fever, most common in the tropics, causes high fever, headache and rash, along with severe joint and muscle pain.

Oxitec developed the technology, which the Mosquito Research and Control Unit, backed by the Cayman Islands government, implemented for the study, Oxitec Chief Executive Officer Hadyn Parry said in an interview.

–With assistance from Makiko Kitamura in London. Editors: Chris Staiti, Bruce Rule

To contact the reporter on this story: Reg Gale at rgale5@bloomberg.net.

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Reg Gale at rgale5@bloomberg.net.