Tag Archives: Mosquito Control

Disease-Carrying Mosquitoes Continue to Bite as Summer Draws to a Close

Hulett Environmental Services encourages ongoing vigilance against mosquitoes and mosquito-borne diseases 

Summer is in its final weeks, but that doesn’t mean mosquitoes will disappear with the arrival of cooler weather. Hulett Environmental Services a pest management company servicing South Florida, urges people to remain cautious of mosquitoes, as they are known to flourish well into the fall months, continuing to pose a health risk.

Although mosquitoes are often associated with the summer heat, they also thrive during the fall season. In fact, mosquitoes will remain active until the temperature drops below 60 degrees, which means the threat of mosquito-borne diseases is still a concern in the coming weeks.

In the United States, mosquitoes are known to spread West Nile virus, eastern equine encephalitis and, in recent months, chikungunya virus. These illnesses do not have specific vaccines or treatments, so prevention of mosquito bites throughout the fall months is crucial.

As the seasons begin to change, it’s still important for people to apply bug spray containing DEET, picaridin or oil of lemon eucalyptus when spending time outdoors. This alone will significantly decrease their chances of getting bitten by an infected mosquito.

Hulett Environmental Services also recommends the following tips to avoid exposure to mosquitoes.

  • Wear long pants, long-sleeved shirts and closed-toe shoes to protect the skin
  • Minimize outside activity between dusk and dawn, when mosquitoes are most active
  • Eliminate areas of standing water around the home, such as flowerpots, birdbaths and baby pools. Mosquitoes only need about ½ inch of water to breed
  • Screen all windows and doors, repairing even the smallest holes that could serve as entry points for pests

 

For more information on mosquitoes, please visit www.bugs.com

How can I prevent West Nile virus?

How can I prevent West Nile virus?

There are a number of precautions that people can take to protect their home and family from mosquitoes and minimize the potential of contracting West Nile virus. The NPMA recommends the following tips:

  • Eliminate or reduce mosquito-breeding sites around the home by replacing all standing water at least once a week. This includes birdbaths, flowerpots, grill covers, baby pools and other objects where water collects. Mosquitoes on need about ½ inch of water to breed.
  • Screen windows, doors, and other openings with mesh. Repair even the smallest tear or hole.
    • Use mesh that is 18X18 strands per inch, or finer.
    • Seal around all screen edges; and keep doors and windows shut to prevent entry of most mosquito species.
  • Minimize outside activity between dusk and dawn, when mosquitoes are most active.
  • When outdoors, wear long-sleeved shirts and long-legged pants.
  • Use an insect repellent containing DEET, picaridin or oil of lemon-eucalyptus on exposed skin whenever outdoors. Check product labels for information on age restrictions to make sure they are safe for your toddler or infant.

If you are concerned about mosquito activity on your property, consider contacting a pest management company. They can help reduce exposure to mosquitoes and decrease the risks for mosquito-borne illnesses by inspecting properties for mosquito breeding sites and treating to control mosquitoes. In addition, they can suggest corrective actions, and provide basic information, current news and references to other sources.

 

You can also contact your municipality or township to see if your community has a mosquito management program in place. Only a concerted community-wide effort can properly manage these pests and reduce the risks associated with them.

ABCNews.com: Associated Press – 81 Cases of Mosquito Virus Now Tailed in Florida

ABCNews.com: Associated Press – 81 Cases of Mosquito Virus Now Tailed in Florida

Pest Control Palm Beach

State officials say the number of Florida travelers who contracted the mosquito-borne chikungunya (chik-in-GUHN’-yuh) virus has risen to 81.

Florida’s Department of Health says 15 new cases of the virus were reported last week. Officials say all the patients documented in Florida contracted the virus while traveling in the Caribbean.

Chikungunya is transmitted to humans by infected mosquitoes. It was documented in 40 countries in Asia, Africa and Europe before it was first confirmed in the Caribbean late last year.

Symptoms typically begin three to seven days after being bitten and include fever and severe joint pain, often in the hands and feet. There is no vaccine, but it rarely kills those infected.

People infected with chikungunya are urged to avoid mosquito bites to prevent transmitting the virus.

Mosquito Season is Here – Public Urged to Take Precautions

Mosquito Season is Here – Public Urged to Take Precautions

Hulett Environmental offers tips to prevent mosquito bites when outdoors this summer 

Warmer weather is finally here and South Florida residents are no doubt spending more time outdoors. However, with increased outdoor activity, the public is at risk of becoming a meal for summer’s most dangerous and pesky pest – the mosquito. As such, Hulett Environmental Services a pest management company servicing Southern Florida, is urging the public to take preventative measures to protect themselves and their families.

Mosquitoes are emerging early across the country due to recent rainfall and an increase in temperatures,” Greg Rice, at Hulett Environmental Services. “With the threat of West Nile virus and other mosquito-borne diseases, it’s important for people to take the necessary precautions to prevent mosquito bites when spending time outdoors in the coming months.”

Hulett Environmental Services offers the following tips to avoid becoming a mosquito meal:

  • Eliminate areas of standing water around the home such as flowerpots, birdbaths, baby pools, grill covers and other objects where water collects. Mosquitoes need only about a ½ inch of water to breed.
  • Screen all windows and doors. Repair even the smallest tear or hole.
  • Minimize outside activity between dusk and dawn, when mosquitoes are most active. If you must be outside during those times, consider staying inside a screened-in porch or dressing in clothing that leaves very little exposed skin.
  • Avoid wearing dark colors, loose-fitting garments, and open-toe shoes.
  • Always use an insect repellant containing DEET, picaridin, IR3535 or oil of lemon eucalyptus when spending time outdoors or traveling, especially in areas known to have increased mosquito populations.
  • If you are concerned about mosquito activity in your area, contact a pest management company or your local mosquito abatement district.

For more information on mosquitoes and other summer pests, please visit http://www.bugs.com/bugs_database/other_bugs/mosquitoes.asp

Outdoor Party
Outdoor Party

For an outdoor event, Hulett has another effective tool in its pest control arsenal to cover large areas. Hulett’s Mosquito Fogging Services which uses the ULV (Ultra Low Volume) foggers to combat and deflect adult mosquito populations outdoors — from backyards to community common areas, condominium properties to businesses — anywhere people may want to gather to enjoy the beautiful South Florida lifestyle.

If you want immediate and effective relief from biting mosquitoes … Call Hulett and ask about the Mosquito Control Program and Mosquito Fogging Service! Used together or separately as need – Mosquitoes don’t stand a chance with Hulett!

South Florida Mosquito Control

Why are mosquitoes considered a dangerous pest?

Mosquitoes are known to transmit many potentially fatal diseases to both humans and mammals, such as horses.  Some of the most common and well-known diseases include West Nile Virus, malaria, dengue fever and equine encephalitis (EEE). In Africa, more than 700,000 children die each year from malaria.

Is West Nile virus something that the average American should be concerned about?

West Nile virus is a common concern among Americans – and rightfully so. West Nile virus has continued to spread across the country since the first reported incidence in 1999. The worst year for the mosquito-borne disease was 2002, which saw nearly 3,000 severe cases and 284 deaths, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. However, experts are predicting that the outbreak in 2012 might become the deadliest ever. As of September 18, there have been 3,142 cases and 134 deaths reported to the CDC this year. Texas has remained the epicenter, accounting for forty percent of the nation’s West Nile virus cases.

Are mosquitoes more prevalent during a specific season?

Mosquitoes are considered one of summer’s most dangerous pests, but they also thrive in the fall. In fact, mosquitoes will remain active until temperatures drop below 60 degrees, so people are currently still at an increased risk of contracting West Nile virus.

Does the weather have an impact on the spread of West Nile virus?

There is no solid evidence as to why 2012 has been such a bad year for West Nile virus, but experts speculate that the extreme heat and drought conditions experienced across the country are a factor. All insects are cold-blooded, which means that their body temperatures are regulated by outside temperatures. When the weather gets hotter, larva grow at a faster pace, breeding cycle speeds up and pests including mosquitoes become more active.

What are the symptoms of West Nile virus?

Dr. Jorge Parada, medical spokesperson for the NPMA, says that in most cases, symptoms of West Nile virus are so slight they go by unnoticed or feel like summer flu. However, in extreme cases, it can be a potentially life-threatening infection with a high fever, head and body aches, worsening weakness, confusion and even coma.

What should I do if I suspect that I have West Nile virus?

If you start experiencing symptoms of West Nile virus, it’s important to seek immediate medical attention.

How can I prevent West Nile virus?

There are a number of precautions that people can take to protect their home and family from mosquitoes and minimize the potential of contracting West Nile virus. The NPMA recommends the following tips:

  • Eliminate or reduce mosquito-breeding sites around the home by replacing all standing water at least once a week. This includes birdbaths, flowerpots, grill covers, baby pools and other objects where water collects. Mosquitoes on need about ½ inch of water to breed.
  • Screen windows, doors, and other openings with mesh. Repair even the smallest tear or hole.
    • Use mesh that is 18X18 strands per inch, or finer.
    • Seal around all screen edges; and keep doors and windows shut to prevent entry of most mosquito species.
  • Minimize outside activity between dusk and dawn, when mosquitoes are most active.
  • When outdoors, wear long-sleeved shirts and long-legged pants.
  • Use an insect repellent containing DEET, picaridin or oil of lemon-eucalyptus on exposed skin whenever outdoors. Check product labels for information on age restrictions to make sure they are safe for your toddler or infant.

If you are concerned about mosquito activity on your property, consider contacting a pest management company. They can help reduce exposure to mosquitoes and decrease the risks for mosquito-borne illnesses by inspecting properties for mosquito breeding sites and treating to control mosquitoes. In addition, they can suggest corrective actions, and provide basic information, current news and references to other sources.

You can also contact your municipality or township to see if your community has a mosquito management program in place. Only a concerted community-wide effort can properly manage these pests and reduce the risks associated with them.

Hulett Environmental Services offers advice for homeowners on mosquito prevention around the property

Hulett Environmental Services offers advice for homeowners on mosquito prevention around the property

Hulett Environmental  offers the following mosquito prevention tips:

  • Eliminate areas of standing water around the home such as flowerpots, birdbaths, baby pools, grill covers and other objects where water collects. Mosquitoes need only about ½ inch of water to breed.
  • Screen all windows and doors. Repair even the smallest tear or hole.
  • Minimize outside activity between dusk and dawn, when mosquitoes are most active.
  • If you must spend time outdoors during peak mosquito times, wear long pants, sleeves and socks. Also, use an insect repellent containing DEET, picaridin or IR3535.
  • Avoid wearing dark colors and floral prints, loose-fitting garments, open-toe shoes and sweet-smelling perfumes or colognes.

If homeowners are concerned about mosquito activity in their area, they should consider contacting a pest management company or the local mosquito abatement district for assistance.

Traveling for Spring Break? Be Vigilant of Mosquitoes

Traveling for Spring Break? Be Vigilant of Mosquitoes

Hulett cautions travelers about mosquito-borne diseases

Many people are looking forward to escaping the winter chill by jet setting to a warmer destination during Spring Break, but they may find themselves with a biting problem – mosquitoes. Hulett Environmental, a pest management company servicing South Florida encourages Spring Break travelers, especially those visiting a tropical location, to take precautions to protect themselves from these blood-sucking pests.

Unfortunately, mosquitoes can inflict more then just painful bites. Travelers are at an added risk of contracting mosquito-borne diseases like West Nile virus, Malaria and Dengue Fever.

Anyone traveling to the Caribbean should also be aware of Chikungunya virus, an infection spread by Asian tiger mosquitoes that was recently reported in St. Martin. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the virus is characterized by fever, rash, fatigue, vomiting and intense muscle and joint pain that can last for weeks in serious cases.

The National Pest Management Association (NPMA) suggests the following tips to avoid mosquito bites while basking in the sun:

  • Minimize outside activity, particularly at dusk and dawn, when mosquitoes are most active.
  • If you must spend time outdoors during peak mosquito times, use an insect repellant containing DEET, picaridin or IR3535.
  • Avoid wearing dark colors and floral prints, loose-fitting garments, open-toe shoes and sweet-smelling perfumes or colognes.
  • If bitten by a mosquito, clean the area thoroughly, avoid scratching, and apply anti-itch cream.
  • Seek prompt medical attention if you experience additional symptoms such as high fever, head and body aches, confusion or weakness.

For more information, visit www.bugs.com

Traveling for Spring Break? Be Vigilant of Mosquitoes

Traveling for Spring Break? Be Vigilant of Mosquitoes

Hulett Environmental Services cautions travelers about mosquito-borne diseases

Many people are looking forward to escaping the winter chill by jet setting to a warmer destination during Spring Break, but they may find themselves with a biting problem – mosquitoes. Hulett Environmental Services, a pest management company servicing South Florida encourages Spring Break travelers, especially those visiting a tropical location, to take precautions to protect themselves from these blood-sucking pests.

Florida Mosquito Experts www.bugs.com

Anyone traveling to the Caribbean should also be aware of Chikungunya virus, an infection spread by Asian tiger mosquitoes that was recently reported in St. Martin. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the virus is characterized by fever, rash, fatigue, vomiting and intense muscle and joint pain that can last for weeks in serious cases.

 

 

Experts at Hulett Environmental suggests the following tips to avoid mosquito bites while basking in the sun:

  • Minimize outside activity, particularly at dusk and dawn, when mosquitoes are most active.
  • If you must spend time outdoors during peak mosquito times, use an insect repellant containing DEET, picaridin or IR3535.
  • Avoid wearing dark colors and floral prints, loose-fitting garments, open-toe shoes and sweet-smelling perfumes or colognes.
  • If bitten by a mosquito, clean the area thoroughly, avoid scratching, and apply anti-itch cream.
  • Seek prompt medical attention if you experience additional symptoms such as high fever, head and body aches, confusion or weakness.

For more information, visit www.bugs.com

Follow Hulett Environmental Services on LinkedIn with your QR Reader

Follow Hulett Environmental on LinkedIn with your QR Reader

Protect yourself from stinging insects over the next few months

Here are a few facts to help homeowners protect themselves from stinging insects over the next few months:

  • Stinging insects send more than 500,000 people to the emergency room every year. They can swarm and sting en masse, which can be life threatening especially for anyone who has an allergic reaction.
  • Unlike some stinging insect species, wasps are known for their unprovoked aggression. A single colony of wasps can contain more than 15,000 members, so an infestation should not be taken lightly.
  • Common nesting sites include under eaves, on ceiling beams in attics, garages and sheds and under porches. Some stinging insects can build their nests in the ground, including yellowjackets and velvet ants (which are actually a species of wasps). Over-seeding the yard provides more coverage and discourages these pests from nesting around the property.
  • Painting or staining untreated wood in fences, decks, swing sets and soffits will help keep stinging insects such as carpenter bees out. Carpenter bees create nests by drilling tunnels into soft wood, which can severely compromise the stability of a structure over time.
  • Only female carpenter bees have stingers. Female carpenter bees will only sting if threatened, but reactions to these stings can range from mild irritation to life-threatening respiratory distress.