Tag Archives: Mosquito Control

Massive Boom in Insect Repellent Sales

Massive Boom in Insect Repellent Sales

Lines are forming outside convenience stores, people waiting in anxious anticipation to get into the store and purchase as much insect repellent and bug zappers as they can carry out of the store. The threat of the Zika virus is looming over the country as we get closer and closer to summer and the ideal temperatures and conditions for mosquitos to flourish and invade our homes, streets, backyards, parks…pretty much our entire world. People’s interest in buying insect repellent and bug spray has increased to near astounding levels. Many stores are stocking extra insect repellent and bug spray in response to the greater demand for the products. For example, one store increased their insect repellent and bug spray inventory by a whopping 25 percent. Demand for the products have increased  by 50 percent throughout the country.

And with the Zika virus looming over our heads people are finally doing everything they can to learn more about the virus. Citizens are mostly concerned for young individuals that are coming to the point in their life when they want to have children, as the Zika virus has been proven to cause microcephaly in newborns.

One new bug trap that seems promising is the Mosquito Magnet. This propane-powered device releases carbon dioxide into the air. This attracts mosquitos, who are then sucked up through a vacuum into a net.

Have you started preparing for the Zika virus? Can you think of any other ideas for bug traps that would work to get rid of these nasty pests?

Utah Woman with Zika Virus Delivers Healthy Baby

Utah Woman with Zika Virus Delivers Healthy Baby

For months we have been hearing all about the devastating risks of Zika—but it seems there is finally some good news coming out of the reports surrounding the Zika Virus.

According to The Salt Lake County Health Department, a woman in Utah who was infected with the Zika Virus while pregnant gave birth to a healthy baby boy. The infant tested negative for the virus.

Another important note—the woman, as with all U.S. cases so far, contracted the virus while travelling abroad.

Given this news, health officials will continue to investigate the link between Zika infections in pregnant women and a rare birth defect called microcephaly. There is a possibility that the likelihood of transmission from mother to infant depends on which trimester of the pregnancy the virus is contracted.

Are you surprised at this good news coming out of Utah? Do you think a vaccine for the Zika Virus is on the horizon?

 

If you have any concerns about mosquitoes in your area, be sure to hire a professional pest control company that offers mosquito reduction services.

New Zika Guidance for Couples Planning Pregnancy

New Zika Guidance for Couples Planning Pregnancy

The Zika virus has been linked to a birth defect called microcephaly in babies born to mothers who contracted the virus during pregnancy. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have been very clear about their advice to pregnant women: do not travel to areas with active Zika transmission.

But what about couples that are planning to become pregnant? The CDC has issued new guidelines for those trying to conceive: if the male or female partner has been exposed to the Zika virus, wait at least six months before trying for a baby.

“Unfortunately, there is a lot we don’t know,” Dr. Denise J. Jamieson, CDC Zika Virus Response Team. “These recommendations are the best attempt to predict.”

What do you think? Do you think couples planning on becoming parents will heed the advice of the CDC? If you were planning a family and were exposed to the Zika virus would you wait the recommended six months?

If you have any concerns about mosquitoes in your area, we encourage you to check out our mosquito reduction services.

 

Zika 101

Zika 101

index21Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you are familiar with the Zika virus and the threat it poses, particularly to pregnant women. But with so much news coming out with each passing day, what are the basics of Zika that we should all know?

For starters, Zika first appeared in Brazil in May of 2015. Outbreaks have occurred before in Africa and Asia, but the disease is new to the Western Hemisphere. Since then, it is suspected than 1.5 million people have been infected in Brazil alone, and the virus has spread to Latin America.

Symptoms are typically mild (fever and joint pain) and only affect 1 in 5 people, and usually last only one week.

Most notably, however, if a pregnant woman is infected, it’s suspected the virus can cause brain damage in her unborn child. It has also been reported that the Zika virus is linked to a rare condition called Guillain Barre, which causes temporary paralysis in patients of all ages.

The Zika virus is carried by the same mosquito that carries yellow fever, chikungunya, and dengue. This mosquito is present in areas of America, but mosquito control in the U.S. is often much better than in Latin America.

Have you been staying up to date with the news surrounding the Zika virus? Are you concerned it will start spreading in the U.S.?

How YOU Can Protect Yourself Against the Zika Virus

How YOU Can Protect Yourself Against the Zika Virus 

The World Health Organization has officially stated that the Zika Virus is a Global Health Emergency. This is only the fourth time the organization has raised such an alert, so it’s easy to understand why people are concerned, and also wanting to know what they can do to protect themselves at home and abroad.

First and foremost, be sure to use an EPA- registered repellant. Apply it often and to any exposed skin. This is particularly important for women who are pregnant or who are planning on becoming pregnant and live or are travelling to Latin American countries where mosquitoes that transmit the virus are most prevalent.

It’s expected that this type of mosquito will also make its way to states in America, including Florida, so protecting ourselves at home is also key.

“If you’re not taking precautions against mosquitoes, keeping them out of your house, you’re part of the problem, indeed,” Joe Conlon of the American Mosquito Control Association told CBS News.

We could not agree more with the guidance from the American Mosquito Control Association. Preparedness is critical, and when it comes to the safety of your family, always leave pest control to the experts. Check out our mosquito control services to see how we can ensure you enjoy your yards, patios and pools even amidst concerns of the Zika virus.

Are you taking precautions when it comes to Zika? Do you feel there is enough evidence to be concerned?

The World Health Organization has officially stated that the Zika Virus is a Global Health Emergency. This is only the fourth time the organization has raised such an alert, so it’s easy to understand why people are concerned, and also wanting to know what they can do to protect themselves at home and abroad.

First and foremost, be sure to use an EPA- registered repellant. Apply it often and to any exposed skin. This is particularly important for women who are pregnant or who are planning on becoming pregnant and live or are travelling to Latin American countries where mosquitoes that transmit the virus are most prevalent.

It’s expected that this type of mosquito will also make its way to states in America, including Florida, so protecting ourselves at home is also key.

“If you’re not taking precautions against mosquitoes, keeping them out of your house, you’re part of the problem, indeed,” Joe Conlon of the American Mosquito Control Association told CBS News.

We could not agree more with the guidance from the American Mosquito Control Association. Preparedness is critical, and when it comes to the safety of your family, always leave pest control to the experts. Check out our mosquito control services to see how we can ensure you enjoy your yards, patios and pools even amidst concerns of the Zika virus.

Are you taking precautions when it comes to Zika? Do you feel there is enough evidence to be concerned?

How to Beat Mosquitos

How to Beat Mosquitos

A recent wave of air-sprayed insecticide has been sweeping through cities as the preferred method for eliminating issues with mosquitos. Most of the time this occurs in Florida cities as the weather and humidity of the air result in some of the perfect breeding grounds for these insects.

Of course there are other instances that result in mosquitos breeding in large quantities. The perfect breeding grounds for these insects are standing water. While you can’t always count on getting rid of standing water such as lakes and puddles of streams, you can take care of things like water building up in trash cans or dirt holes around your property which can lead to mosquito breeding and infestation.

In fact, it is recommended that you spend some time after each rainfall, cleaning out gutters, pool covers, garbage cans, flower pots, or anything else that could potentially house still water. It doesn’t matter what the water is in, if mosquitos come across it they will take advantage of it for breeding purposes.

Even if your city does resort to air spray insecticide to handle mosquitos, you still need to do your part to make sure your home isn’t being invaded by these potentially dangerous insects out for your blood. It doesn’t take more than a few minutes to make sure areas around your house are clean of free-standing water and it could save you some hassle in the long run.

Disease-Carrying Mosquitoes Continue to Bite as Summer Draws to a Close

Hulett Environmental Services encourages ongoing vigilance against mosquitoes and mosquito-borne diseases 

Summer is in its final weeks, but that doesn’t mean mosquitoes will disappear with the arrival of cooler weather. Hulett Environmental Services a pest management company servicing South Florida, urges people to remain cautious of mosquitoes, as they are known to flourish well into the fall months, continuing to pose a health risk.

Although mosquitoes are often associated with the summer heat, they also thrive during the fall season. In fact, mosquitoes will remain active until the temperature drops below 60 degrees, which means the threat of mosquito-borne diseases is still a concern in the coming weeks.

In the United States, mosquitoes are known to spread West Nile virus, eastern equine encephalitis and, in recent months, chikungunya virus. These illnesses do not have specific vaccines or treatments, so prevention of mosquito bites throughout the fall months is crucial.

As the seasons begin to change, it’s still important for people to apply bug spray containing DEET, picaridin or oil of lemon eucalyptus when spending time outdoors. This alone will significantly decrease their chances of getting bitten by an infected mosquito.

Hulett Environmental Services also recommends the following tips to avoid exposure to mosquitoes.

  • Wear long pants, long-sleeved shirts and closed-toe shoes to protect the skin
  • Minimize outside activity between dusk and dawn, when mosquitoes are most active
  • Eliminate areas of standing water around the home, such as flowerpots, birdbaths and baby pools. Mosquitoes only need about ½ inch of water to breed
  • Screen all windows and doors, repairing even the smallest holes that could serve as entry points for pests

 

For more information on mosquitoes, please visit www.bugs.com

How can I prevent West Nile virus?

How can I prevent West Nile virus?

There are a number of precautions that people can take to protect their home and family from mosquitoes and minimize the potential of contracting West Nile virus. The NPMA recommends the following tips:

  • Eliminate or reduce mosquito-breeding sites around the home by replacing all standing water at least once a week. This includes birdbaths, flowerpots, grill covers, baby pools and other objects where water collects. Mosquitoes on need about ½ inch of water to breed.
  • Screen windows, doors, and other openings with mesh. Repair even the smallest tear or hole.
    • Use mesh that is 18X18 strands per inch, or finer.
    • Seal around all screen edges; and keep doors and windows shut to prevent entry of most mosquito species.
  • Minimize outside activity between dusk and dawn, when mosquitoes are most active.
  • When outdoors, wear long-sleeved shirts and long-legged pants.
  • Use an insect repellent containing DEET, picaridin or oil of lemon-eucalyptus on exposed skin whenever outdoors. Check product labels for information on age restrictions to make sure they are safe for your toddler or infant.

If you are concerned about mosquito activity on your property, consider contacting a pest management company. They can help reduce exposure to mosquitoes and decrease the risks for mosquito-borne illnesses by inspecting properties for mosquito breeding sites and treating to control mosquitoes. In addition, they can suggest corrective actions, and provide basic information, current news and references to other sources.

 

You can also contact your municipality or township to see if your community has a mosquito management program in place. Only a concerted community-wide effort can properly manage these pests and reduce the risks associated with them.

ABCNews.com: Associated Press – 81 Cases of Mosquito Virus Now Tailed in Florida

ABCNews.com: Associated Press – 81 Cases of Mosquito Virus Now Tailed in Florida

Pest Control Palm Beach

State officials say the number of Florida travelers who contracted the mosquito-borne chikungunya (chik-in-GUHN’-yuh) virus has risen to 81.

Florida’s Department of Health says 15 new cases of the virus were reported last week. Officials say all the patients documented in Florida contracted the virus while traveling in the Caribbean.

Chikungunya is transmitted to humans by infected mosquitoes. It was documented in 40 countries in Asia, Africa and Europe before it was first confirmed in the Caribbean late last year.

Symptoms typically begin three to seven days after being bitten and include fever and severe joint pain, often in the hands and feet. There is no vaccine, but it rarely kills those infected.

People infected with chikungunya are urged to avoid mosquito bites to prevent transmitting the virus.