Tag Archives: Pest Control Service West Palm Beach FL

Cockroaches seek shelter from the cold which could mean trouble for allergy sufferers

Cockroaches seek shelter from the cold which could mean trouble for allergy sufferers

Exterminator in West Palm Beach

Most people think of pollen, dust and animal dander as common asthma and allergy triggers. However, Hulett Environmental, a pest management company servicing South Florida warns that cockroaches can also pose a threat to allergy and asthma sufferers. The threat for cockroach allergens is elevated in the winter because there a greater chance for cockroaches to invade homes in search of warmth and because families spend more time inside.

Children are the most at risk to be affected by this often-overlooked asthma trigger. Cockroaches spread over 33 types of bacteria, including E. coli, and studies show that about one in five children in the U.S. are sensitive to cockroach allergens.

Hulett Environmental advises homeowners to seal cracks around the outside of their home, keep counters and floors clean and free of crumbs that can attract the pests and vacuum frequently. Kitchens and bathrooms are particularly vulnerable to cockroach infestations due to the presence of food products and moisture around sinks or appliances.

If you suspect you have an infestation, contact a licensed pest professional who will be able to recommend a course of treatment. To learn more about cockroaches and the health threats they pose, visit www.bugs.com

Brown recluse spiders in South Florida Make Annual inspections A Must

Brown recluse spiders have a characteristic dark brown violin marking on their back.

32_Brown Recluse Spider

Brown recluse spiders are nocturnal and eat other bugs like cockroaches and crickets. However you still don’t want them around.

The bite of the brown widow spider has been described as causing an initial pain comparable to the prick of a needle and leaves two red puncture marks (caused by the two fangs). This is followed by sharp pain which may lessen or persist for a number of hours. The pain moves from the site of the wound and settles in the abdomen and legs. Other neurological symptoms include nausea, vomiting, faintness, dizziness, tremors, loss of muscle tone, shock, speech disturbances, and general motor paralysis. However, death is rare.

Do you live in Florida and think that this spider may be invading your home? Hulett Environmental Services offers specialty pest control treatments designed to control and eliminate this pest!

Male brown recluse spiders wander farther than females and will crawl into shoes or other clothing.

Brown recluse spiders often live outdoors in debris and wood piles. They can be found indoors in storage areas and dark recesses. They are not a spider you want to encounter.

Like the black widow spider, the brown recluse spider bites in defense and does not bite humans instinctively. They will bite humans when the clothing they are hiding in is worn. The brown recluse spider bite is painful and can produce an open, ulcerating sore.

Brown recluse spiders in South Florida

Miami_SPider_Control

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Utilize these South Florida Spider Prevention Tips:

  • Install screens and weather stripping on windows and door sweeps on doors.
  • Fix any cracks in siding and walls, especially where pipes or wires enter the home.
  • Store clothing and shoes inside plastic containers, and shake out all clothing that has been in a hamper, on the floor or in storage before wearing.
  • Wear heavy gloves when moving items that have been stored for a long period of time.
  • Inspect shoes before wearing them, as spiders often hide inside.
  • Reduce clutter in basements, garages and attics.
  • Contact a Licensed Florida pest management professional as soon as you see spider activity inside your home
  • Get annual, free pest inspections

New Children’s eBook ~ The Uninvited Houseguest

New Children’s eBook ~ The Uninvited Houseguest

The NPMA just released a second free eBook, “The Uninvited House Guest,” in its children’s eBook series.

“The Uninvited Houseguest” eBook

uninvited houseguest ebook

Download a Copy

“The Uninvited Houseguest” is available from any of the following online retailers:

Don’t have an eBook reader? Click here to open a digital flip-book version.

Jo-Lynne Shane

About the Author

Jo-Lynne Shane is a professional blogger, freelance writer and community manager living in the suburbs of Philadelphia with her husband of 18 years, three school-age children and one terribly spoiled Shih Tzu named Savannah. She writes the popular lifestyle blog, Musings of a Housewife, where she shares nutritious wholesome recipes, fitness inspiration from a recovering couch potato, relatable style and beauty advice for the suburban housewife, and reviews of family friendly travel destinations. She also facilitates the vibrant local networking group, Philly Social Media Moms, providing community, support and education for over 200 area bloggers.

A Hidden Danger in Your Home: Cockroaches

A Hidden Danger in Your Home: Cockroaches

Cockroaches are more than just a household nuisance; they are also significant danger in the home. Hulett Environmental  warns that cockroaches can pose a health threat to humans by spreading many different types of bacteria that can increase asthma and allergy symptoms, especially in children.22_Brownbanded Cockroach

The National Pest Management Association (NPMA) reports that cockroaches are known to spread diseases like Salmonella by picking up germs on the spines of their legs. Furthermore, their saliva and droppings contain allergen proteins known to cause allergy flare-ups and increase asthma symptoms.

During the colder months, the threat for accumulated cockroach allergens is elevated because people spend more time indoors, thus increasing their chances of encountering cockroaches. Since the temperatures are still dropping in certain regions across the country, it’s not too late for homeowners to take preventative measures to keep cockroaches out of the home.

Hulett experts advise homeowners that cockroaches prefer warm, moist places with available food sources, so it’s important to eliminate those attractive environments. Homeowners should pay special attention to kitchens and bathrooms — especially under appliances and sinks — as these areas are particularly vulnerable to cockroach infestations. In addition, homeowners should vacuum frequently, and keep counters and floors clean at all times.

If a cockroach infestation is suspected, a licensed pest professional will properly identify what species is present and recommend the best course of treatment.

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SHOULD HOMEOWNERS/RESIDENTS BE CONCERNED IF THEY FIND ANTS IN THEIR HOME?

Most species of ants are considered ‘nuisance pests,’ meaning that they don’t pose a significant threat to health or property, but are an annoyance when found indoors. In fact, ants are the number one nuisance pest in the United States.

09_Carpenter Ant

(Carpenter Ant)

Some species of ants, however, can pose threats to health and property. Carpenter ants, for example, excavate wood in order to build their nests, which can cause extensive damage to a structure. Fire ants, on the other hand, sting when threatened, resulting in painful welts that can be dangerous to allergic persons. These species should always be handled by a professional.

Regardless of the species all ants can contaminate food sources and small infestations can grow quickly, so any sign of an infestation should be dealt with promptly.

Tips to protect your home from termites

There are many steps homeowners can take to protect their greatest investments from termites. Experts at Hulett Environmental recommend the following tips:

  • Carefully inspect the perimeter of the home for mud tubes (used by termites to reach a food source), cracked or bubbling paint and rotting wood.
  • Repair fascia, soffits and rotted roof shingles. Some termites are drawn to deteriorating wood.
  • Keep basements, attics and crawl spaces well ventilated and dry.
  • Maintain a one-inch gap between soil and wood portions of the home.
  • Store firewood at least 20 feet away from the house and 5 inches up off the ground, and inspect it closely before bringing it indoors.
  • Divert water away from the property through properly functioning downspouts, gutters and splash blocks.

Honoring All Who Served

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Honoring All Who Served!

Protect your property against tawny crazy ants

Protect properties against tawny crazy ants

Fire ants have long been a threat in the southern United States, but another aggressive ant species known as the tawny crazy ant is taking over in many areas of the region. These ants can invade structures in extraordinary numbers and, Hulett Environmental, a pest management company servicing South Florida is advising homeowners to take preventative steps to protect their properties from infestations.

Unlike fire ants, crazy ants don’t sting, but they can become a nuisance once inside. They are highly adaptable, nest everywhere and are even known to damage electrical equipment, so it is important for homeowners to take steps to curb their activity.

Crazy ants enter homes in the autumn or after rainfall because both conditions reduce their supply of honeydew. Once inside, crazy ants usually nest underneath floors or in wall voids. Outdoors, their nests are commonly found in soil under objects or next to foundations.

To prevent crazy ants from gaining access to a structure, experts Hulett Environmental

  • Trim vegetation away from the home to prevent pathways inside.
  • Seal all cracks and crevices on the outside of the home, including around doors and windows.
  • Clean up food spills and other potential attractants as soon as possible.
  • If an infestation is suspected, contact a licensed pest professional to treat the problem.

Tracking Giant Hornets That Have Killed at Least 42 People

n a village on the outskirts if An Kang, China, a little girl, just 18-months-old, is dressed head-to-toe in clothing far too hot for the mild fall weather. Her mother removes one of her tiny socks and a still-gaping wound is revealed. An Asian Hornet stung the little girl there one month ago, releasing venom so potent multiple stings can cause kidney failure and death.

It was the only place her flesh was exposed, her mother explained. She gestures over the foot and up the shin, describing how swollen her daughter’s leg became. She was lucky to be stung just once, and survived. So now the girl’s parents make sure she wears socks. It is their best, and their only, defense.

An Kang is ground zero for the horrifying recent outbreak of Asian Hornet, or Giant Asian Hornet as the larger species is known, attacks on humans. Government figures put the death toll at 42 and the number of injured at 1,600. But officials at An Kang tell ABC News the actual number is much higher.
“These hornets have been killing people for some time,” said a city official who requested anonymity, “This year, just in this district more than 20 people have been killed. The number should be a lot higher than that. The number is shocking.”
The Asian Hornet, or Vespa Mandarinia, can grow to be thumb-sized. It is capable of flying at speeds of up to 25 mph and a distance of 50 miles. Their stingers carry a lethal mix of foreign protein that when mixed in the human bloodstream can cause sepsis. Without proper treatment, such as dialysis, a victim will die.

The insect’s existence in An Kang is not new. Nor is this the first time humans have been attacked. For years the Asian Hornet has lived among inhabitants here and elsewhere across East Asia. Parts of Japan in particular have been home to significant populations for years. But they have never attacked like they are attacking now.

Ren Chengan, 28, has lived on the outskirts of An Kang all his life. He remembers seeing hornets quite regularly while playing in the mountainside forest and along the riverbanks as a young boy. When he was around 8, he remembers, he was stung on the back of his head but suffered only minor swelling. Today, his family watches his young niece very carefully. Ren says it is no longer safe for children to play so freely.

During his youth, his family farmed a small piece of land. Eventually, with China’s rise, he says government officials instructed his family to stop farming and open a restaurant to cater to tourists. Ren believes the disruption in the co-existence of his family’s old way of life and the ecosystem of the forest has contributed to the outbreak in hornet attacks.

“If you didn’t bother them,” he says, “they would not bother you.”

Ren points out a hive across the river. It is high in a tree and on a mountain slope, far enough from the road so that passersby do not come close to it. It is possible to see a small swarm of hornets flying above it, but Ren is nonplussed. He guesses it contains up to a thousand of the killer insects.