Tag Archives: South Florida Mosquito Control

Traveling for Spring Break? Be Vigilant of Mosquitoes

Traveling for Spring Break? Be Vigilant of Mosquitoes

Hulett Environmental Services cautions travelers about mosquito-borne diseases

Many people are looking forward to escaping the winter chill by jet setting to a warmer destination during Spring Break, but they may find themselves with a biting problem – mosquitoes. Hulett Environmental Services, a pest management company servicing South Florida encourages Spring Break travelers, especially those visiting a tropical location, to take precautions to protect themselves from these blood-sucking pests.

Florida Mosquito Experts www.bugs.com

Anyone traveling to the Caribbean should also be aware of Chikungunya virus, an infection spread by Asian tiger mosquitoes that was recently reported in St. Martin. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the virus is characterized by fever, rash, fatigue, vomiting and intense muscle and joint pain that can last for weeks in serious cases.

 

 

Experts at Hulett Environmental suggests the following tips to avoid mosquito bites while basking in the sun:

  • Minimize outside activity, particularly at dusk and dawn, when mosquitoes are most active.
  • If you must spend time outdoors during peak mosquito times, use an insect repellant containing DEET, picaridin or IR3535.
  • Avoid wearing dark colors and floral prints, loose-fitting garments, open-toe shoes and sweet-smelling perfumes or colognes.
  • If bitten by a mosquito, clean the area thoroughly, avoid scratching, and apply anti-itch cream.
  • Seek prompt medical attention if you experience additional symptoms such as high fever, head and body aches, confusion or weakness.

For more information, visit www.bugs.com

2012 second-worst year ever for West Nile virus

2012 second-worst year ever for West Nile virus

by Elizabeth Weise

8:34PM EDT October 17. 2012 – West Nile virus cases in the U.S. hit 4,531 as of Tuesday, including 183 deaths, making 2012 the second-worst year ever for the mosquito-borne illness, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Wednesday.

Cases were up 8% from last week, to 282, including 15 more deaths reported, said Erin Staples, a West Nile expert for the CDC. The numbers don’t represent a new wave of mosquito activity, but rather cases slowly working their way through to the CDC, she said. “It’s a reporting lag. We’re not hearing from our state partners that they’re getting a deluge of cases.”

It can take several weeks from when a person feels ill, goes to the doctor and then is tested for West Nile virus. Next, the report must go to the local health department and then to the state health department, which reports it to the CDC. The CDC then updates its numbers weekly, on Wednesdays. “So what we’re seeing is probably illnesses that occurred in September,” Staples said.

The peak of the disease appears to have hit at the end of August, when cases were going up as much as 35% a week. “As the cold weather sets in, particularly in the North and then moving south, that will stop the mosquito activity and then decrease the number of cases,” Staples said.

The state that has been most affected is Texas with 1,580 cases, of whom 55 died. California is next with 285 cases and 11 deaths.

So far, 2012 has surpassed all years but 2003 for the number of cases. In the past week, it surpassed 2006 and it beat out 2002 the week before, Staples said.

Most people infected with West Nile virus will not have any signs of illness, but 20% will experience mild symptoms such as fever, headache, body aches and, in some cases, a skin rash on the trunk of the body and swollen lymph glands.

People older than 50 and those with compromised immune systems are most at risk. About one in 150 people will get more severe symptoms: headache, high fever, neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation, coma, tremors, convulsions, muscle weakness and paralysis.

Mosquito Control

Mosquito-borne illnesses continue to plague communities throughout the United States. With recent outbreaks of mosquito-borne illnesses in Florida, homeowners everywhere should take steps to protect their family.

Homeowners should consider employing a pest professional to help them control this pest.

As evidenced by the increasing incidence of West Nile Virus, mosquito infestations continue well into the year.

The National Pest Management Association and Hulett Environmental offer the following advice on keeping mosquitoes out of homes:

  • Eliminate potential mosquito breading grounds like birdbaths and baby pools by changing the water at least once per week.
  • Remove excess vegetation around any standing water sources that cannot be changed, dumped or removed.
  • Check your screens for any holes to keep them out of your house.

To learn more about mosquito-transmitted diseases, please visit www.pestworld.org and www.bugs.com