Tag Archives: Termite Inspection

What Termite Treatment Does Hulett Environmental Recommend?

The truth is, there are two kinds of homes: those that have had termites and those that will get them.  And, while they cause $5 billion in damage each year, there is no reason to run away from the purchase.  A pest control professional can correct the problem so that you can live comfortably in your dream home.

Termites are nearly impossible for homeowners to treat on their own.  On the other hand, pest control professionals have the training, expertise, equipment, and technology to eliminate termite infestations.

What Termite Treatment Does Hulett Recommend?
 

Different types of termites require different types of termite control services, and Hulett provides all of the most effective and environmentally responsible termite treatments!

Drywood Termites:

With Over 55 Florida LocationsDrywood termites require treatments such as Hulett’s structural (tent) fumigation or Hulett’s No Tent Termite Control. Both services are extremely effective, and Hulett can help you decide which one works best for you during your free termite inspection.

Tent fumigation requires the highest degree of skill and that is why very few companies offer this service. Hulett is a member of Dow AgroSciences “Commitment to Excellence” program. This program is a certification of quality and excellence. Companies that have this certification have a proven track record of high quality services and meticulous standards. Hulett has been a member of the “Commitment to Excellence” program since its beginning.

Another option, Hulett’s No Tent Termite Treatment, does not require you to leave your home.  There is no need to remove plants or flowers, no removal of uncanned foods, no removal of cosmetics or medications, no risk of landscaping or roof damage, no disconnecting of satellites or antennas, and no special shrub or tree trimming!  All of these things are part of a tent fumigation.

With Hulett’s No Tent Control, a residual material is used at key entry points to help keep termites from coming back. It is the use of such pioneering techniques that keeps Hulett out in front of the competition.

Subterranean Termites:

Subterranean termites are eliminated in ways such as Hulett’s Liquid Defense treatment or by Termite Baiting Systems.

Hulett’s Liquid Defense treatment creates an invisible liquid barrier around your home.  It manages termite colonies up to six times faster than baiting systems and has virtually no odor.

Baiting systems provide a food source for termites and then use an insect growth regulator to eliminate the colony.

Termite Control:

Do you live in South Florida and think termites may be invading your home or office? Hulett Environmental Services offers specialty termite controltreatments designed to control and eliminate these pests!

Importance of Regular Termite Inspections

After buying a home, homeowners should consider scheduling a professional inspection annually, or at least once every 3-5 years, according to the American Society of Home Inspectors. Also, keep the following termite prevention tips in mind:

  • Keep it dry: Repair leaking faucets, water pipes and AC units which are on the outside of the home. Keep basements, attics and crawl spaces well ventilated and dry. Direct water away from your house through properly functioning downspouts, gutters and splash blocks.
  • Avoid providing harborage: Store firewood at least 20 feet away from the house and 5 inches off the ground. Keep mulch at least 15 inches from the foundation.
  • Know the signs: Routinely inspect the foundation of your home for signs of mud tubes (used by termites to reach a food source), cracked or bubbling paint and wood that sounds hollow when tapped. Monitor all exterior areas of wood, including windows, doorframes and skirting boards for any noticeable changes.

A home is often the single largest investment a person will ever make. Homebuyers should arm themselves with as much information as possible about the existing home so they can make informed decisions for their families.

Florida_Termite_Control                    Miami_Termite_Control

Tips to protect your home from termites

There are many steps homeowners can take to protect their greatest investments from termites. Experts at Hulett Environmental recommend the following tips:

  • Carefully inspect the perimeter of the home for mud tubes (used by termites to reach a food source), cracked or bubbling paint and rotting wood.
  • Repair fascia, soffits and rotted roof shingles. Some termites are drawn to deteriorating wood.
  • Keep basements, attics and crawl spaces well ventilated and dry.
  • Maintain a one-inch gap between soil and wood portions of the home.
  • Store firewood at least 20 feet away from the house and 5 inches up off the ground, and inspect it closely before bringing it indoors.
  • Divert water away from the property through properly functioning downspouts, gutters and splash blocks.

Protect yourself from stinging insects over the next few months

Here are a few facts to help homeowners protect themselves from stinging insects over the next few months:

  • Stinging insects send more than 500,000 people to the emergency room every year. They can swarm and sting en masse, which can be life threatening especially for anyone who has an allergic reaction.
  • Unlike some stinging insect species, wasps are known for their unprovoked aggression. A single colony of wasps can contain more than 15,000 members, so an infestation should not be taken lightly.
  • Common nesting sites include under eaves, on ceiling beams in attics, garages and sheds and under porches. Some stinging insects can build their nests in the ground, including yellowjackets and velvet ants (which are actually a species of wasps). Over-seeding the yard provides more coverage and discourages these pests from nesting around the property.
  • Painting or staining untreated wood in fences, decks, swing sets and soffits will help keep stinging insects such as carpenter bees out. Carpenter bees create nests by drilling tunnels into soft wood, which can severely compromise the stability of a structure over time.
  • Only female carpenter bees have stingers. Female carpenter bees will only sting if threatened, but reactions to these stings can range from mild irritation to life-threatening respiratory distress.

Eco-Effective Pest Control

Protect Your Family. Preserve the Planet. Eco-Effective Pest Control.

As individuals across the world make great strides to preserve our planet and increase consumer awareness for environmentally responsible initiatives, the National Pest Management Association (NPMA) is excited to offer the world’s largest and most credible green certification program for pest management professionals – GreenPro.

The GreenPro certification means that your pest management provider must comply with a multitude of qualifications to ensure that you receive a safe and effective service each time they arrive at your door.

GreenPro is the most widely recognized certification available to companies in the pest management industry.

  • It has the most comprehensive standards of any available program.
  • Requires companies that participate to submit to independent audits.
  • Service technicians, salespersons and managers must be trained, tested and recertified.

In addition to green pest management service standards, participating companies are also evaluated on business operations, such as criminal background checks, reference checks, drug screening and more, prior to being able to participate in GreenPro.

It’s easy to go green…

When you are ready to hire a GreenPro company, it’s easy to get started. Just enter your zip code in the locator field at the top-right of the screen and know you’ve made the right decision for your family and the environment.

What is green pest management?

When hiring a GreenPro company for your pest management needs, understand that the technician sent to your account must meet tough standards to ensure that you receive an environmentally responsible service. This kind of service is frequently called integrated pest management (IPM), though GreenPro standards go beyond the requirements of traditional IPM. A GreenPro service includes:

  • The company must first inspect and monitor the property.
  • If the company finds a pest problem, it will first eliminate the sources of food, water and shelter that pests need to survive (for example, they may seal cracks, recommend the installation of screens or remove debris from the exterior of the building).
  • If they need to use a pesticide, they will use products in a manner that minimizes any risk to people, pets or the environment.
  • Before making a traditional pesticide application, they must first discuss it with you and obtain your consent.

2 Newfound Wasps Parasitize Ant-Eating Spiders

Two new species of parasitic wasp have been identified in Portugal, and both parasitize the same species of spider.

The spider Zodarion styliferum belongs to the largest genus of ant-eating spiders, just one of over 100 species. It spends the day sleeping, only emerging at night to hunt its sole source of food. But it doesn’t sleep just anywhere – it builds itself an “igloo” using rocks and dead wood. This miniature house may protect it against a harsh environment or predators, but it’s no defence against the parastoid wasps Calymmochilus dispar and Gelis apterus.

Unfortunately for juvenile Z. styliferum, the wasps are perfectly evolved to negate the walls. When the spider is sleeping during the day, they push their narrow ovipositors (seen coiled beneath the wasp’s abdomen) through the cracks and gaps of its shelter. The wasps lay their eggs on the juvenile (at some point, it is immobilised) and feed on it.

But it’s not only the food source the wasps end up with – they get a nice home to pupate in. The wasps differ in their metamorphoses; while G. apterus spins itself a cocoon before pupating, C. dispar does not. It seems a tragic irony that while the spider’s house cannot protect it against the wasps, it does an excellent job of protecting the wasps themselves.

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To read the paper: http://bit.ly/XjMl1U

Photo: Female G. apterus. Credit to Stanislav Korenko.

http://www.livescience.com/26826-wasps-parasitize-spiders.html

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130204102432.htm

Q & A: Healthcare Facilities & Pest Management

Q & A: Healthcare Facilities & Pest Management

What are the most common pests that healthcare facilities encounter, and what health threats do they pose to patients and staff?

Healthcare facilities are susceptible to most of the pests common in most houses and businesses. Ants, fire ants, bedbugs, cockroaches, ticks, fleas, mice, mosquitoes, rats and spiders, among others, can all slip into buildings as people and deliveries come in and out.   Pests can gain access in backpacks, boxes, delivery vehicles and on people and their belongings.

Pests can transmit a host of diseases to humans and animals with effects ranging from minor discomfort to death. Some diseases spread by pests include:

* Bubonic plague             * Rabies

* Cholera                             * Rocky Mountain spotted fever

* Dengue                            * Salmonellosis

* Encephalitis                    * Shigella

* Dysentery                       * Staph

* Hantavirus                       * Strep

* Lyme disease                 * Tapeworms

* Malaria                             * Trichinosis

* Murine typhus              * Typhoid fever

* Polio                                  * West Nile virus

A study by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and a report in the New England Journal of Medicine show that even among many common asthmatic triggers, cockroach allergens cause the most health problems for asthmatic children. These allergens build up in deposits of droppings, secretions, cast skins, and dead bodies of roaches.

Pest-transmitted diseases can be controlled through proper pest management techniques.  Identification of species, habitat and behavior can help a pest management professional control infestations and subsequently suppress outbreaks of pest-transmitted diseases.

Is it feasible for a facility to employ its own staff members to sustain a pest-free environment?

Just as a facility wouldn’t employ an unlicensed nurse or doctor, the National Pest Management Association recommends that they not take a chance with an untrained and unlicensed pest control professional. If in-house pest management is required, make sure that the individuals are qualified. Arming untrained personnel with pest management tools can be dangerous and most facilities depend on outside pest management firms.

Licensed and professionally trained pest control professionals are best suited to keep health and property-threatening pests in check. Today’s pest control professionals are experts in every sense of the word. They are trained in the latest techniques and necessary to identify pest problems and recommend the safest and most responsible pest management methods available.

Pest control professionals undergo training to meet state regulatory and certification requirements. They participate in industry workshops and forums to further their knowledge of the field. All states offer pesticide applicator certification programs, which require testing on chemical properties, selection, usage rates and safety. To remain certified, most states require continuing education, which includes the latest information about on-site pest management needs assessments and state regulatory requirements.

What are the most important steps to ensure proper pest management?

Pest management plays a major role in allowing us to live healthier, more prosperous and comfortable lives.  To ensure proper pest management always deal with a qualified and licensed pest management company that is a member of national, state or local pest management associations. Membership in the national, and state or local pest control associations is a good indicator that the company has access to modern technical information and is committed to further education.

Reach a complete understanding with the company before work starts; find out what the pest is, how the problem will be treated, how long the period of treatment will be, and what results can be expected. Effective treatment depends on correctly identifying the pest species and developing a treatment that takes the pest’s biology and habits into account.

In between professional pest control visits, employees can take a variety of steps to reduce the likelihood of infestation and ensure proper pest management.  They should remain vigilant in assessing their environment.  Encouraging employees to wipe down exposed areas, secure trash lids, maintain a clean floor space and keep windows and doors fastened will go along way in helping to prevent infestations. Employees can also track pest sightings in a pest sighting log – recording the type of pest, location and behavior.  This will help a pest management professional when they come in to evaluate the facility.

Can pest-control be managed without the use of insecticides? 

While it’s true that insecticides are used in pest control, the pest management industry is in the forefront of widespread efforts to make insecticides part of the program, not the only means to pest control.

The result is called Integrated Pest Management (IPM), a process that goes beyond traditional pest management techniques. Though centuries old, the latest IPM techniques have found broad-based support from the scientific community, government, and the pest management industry.

Integrated Pest Management, or IPM, is a broad approach to pest management that focuses on addressing the reason that the pest problem exists rather than on just the pest itself. IPM accomplishes this by eliminating the three things pests need to survive: food, water and shelter. There are three common steps involved in practicing IPM. They include inspection, pest identification, the establishment of control measures(such as caulking cracks in sidewalks or walls, moving dumpsters away from buildings and appropriate pesticide applications),. To be acceptable, the pest management measures must be both environmentally compatible and economically feasible. The NPMA has advocated IPM for years through seminars, publications, and by supporting its techniques nationwide.

IPM is the springboard of pest management into the new century.  It is the smart way to conduct pest management.