Tag Archives: The mark of excellence in pest management ~ Hulett Enviromental

Pest World Contest

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Mosquito Season Is Here — How Bad Will it Get?

Mosquito Season Is Here — How Bad Will it Get?

FAIRFAX, Va., Jun 18, 2012 (BUSINESS WIRE) — Summer has barely begun but it’s likely many people have already encountered one of the season’s most ubiquitous pests — the mosquito. As is the case with many other insects, mosquitoes have made an early emergence after a mild winter and rainy spring. The National Pest Management Association (NPMA) warns that this might be one of the worst seasons yet, so break out the repellant.

“Mosquito season is highly dependent on rain events, and states are monitoring rainfall and pest management companies are applying treatments accordingly,” noted Missy Henriksen, vice president of public affairs for NPMA. “This summer, mosquito numbers have the potential to grow significantly and it’s important for people to take precautions to avoid exposure.”

Although mosquitoes are known to carry a variety of diseases, West Nile virus (WNV) is of most concern in the United States.

“In most cases West Nile Virus is a mild infection with symptoms so slight they can go unnoticed, or feel like a summer flu. In extreme cases, it can be a potentially life threatening infection with higher fever, head and body aches, worsening weakness, confusion and even coma. Anyone experiencing these symptoms should seek immediate medical attention,” advised Dr. Jorge Parada, medical spokesperson for the NPMA.

The NPMA offers the following tips to avoid becoming a mosquito meal:

– Eliminate areas of standing water around the home such as flowerpots, birdbaths, baby pools, grill covers and other objects where water collects. Mosquitoes need only about 1/2 inch of water to breed.

– Screen all windows and doors. Repair even the smallest tear or hole.

– Minimize outside activity between dusk and dawn, when mosquitoes are most active.

– If you must spend time outdoors during peak mosquito times, wear long pants and sleeves and use an insect repellant containing DEET, picaridin or oil of lemon-eucalyptus.

– If you are concerned about mosquito activity on your property, contact a pest management company or your local mosquito abatement district.

The NPMA, a non-profit organization with more than 7,000 members, was established in 1933 to support the pest management industry’s commitment to the protection of public health, food and property.

SOURCE: National Pest Management Association

Bee Swarm Unleashed in Pasco Garage

MyFOXTampaBay.com: Bee Swarm Unleashed in Pasco Garage


PORT RICHEY – A swarm of bees has been causing some big problems for a family in Port Richey. They made the discovery while cleaning out the garage and they’re having a devil of a time getting rid of them.

The Pizzuto’s certainly had a crazy start to their Thursday morning.  They were doing some spring cleaning in the garage, when suddenly, within minutes it was filled with hundreds of angry bees.

“They’re like swarming, there are millions of them,” said Selena Pizzuto, a 14-year-old, who caught the swarm in-motion on her cell phone camera.

The bees filled the garage, and covered the side door. Rose Pizzuto got a frantic call from her mother Mildred.

“And she said there were some bees moving around in the garage and she had been cleaning, and I came home and I thought, okay, we’ll just buy some spray,” Rose said.

She quickly found out she would need a lot more spray to fix the mess.

“We have bees, like everywhere!,” said her daughter in their home video.

It was a buzzing black cloud of bees, irritated because their nest had been disturbed by her mother’s cleaning.

“I couldn’t believe it, there were bees just swarming everywhere!,” Pizzuto said.

Worried for her kids, she called 911, who then put her in touch with an exterminator. But she didn’t have the extra $150 to pay for it.

“Were you freaking out?,” we asked.  “Yes, I was freaking out majorly!,” she said.  “It was very scary, I’ve never seen such a large swarm before.”

The nest was two shelves up from where she keeps frying pans they use every day. She never noticed the bees until now.  The good news is no one got stung. The bad news is, no matter how much they sprayed, more new bees kept showing up!

“Your neighbor sprayed a few, right?,” we asked. “Yes, my neighbor Michael sprayed the bees the first time,” said Pizzuto.  “And what happened after that?,” we asked. “After that he ran for it and then they all came out of the bees nest!,” said Pizzuto.

“I just saw like hundreds of bees everywhere,” said Selena Pizzuto. “Had you seen something like that before?,” we asked. “Never,” she said. “Like only on TV.”

“Then her looked out the window and her said, Mom, there’s a huge lot of bees out there,” said 5-year-old Ryan, who told us he was not scared of the swarm.

Ryan Willingham with the County Extension Office, who is a bee specialist, explained that we’re in bee season right now. And when hives get full, part of the worker bees branch out with a new queen to find a home.

“Half the workforce takes off and finds another place,” said Willingham.

We asked him if the family was in any danger?

“I wouldn’t necessarily classify it as dangerous, but yet, you don’t know where the bees are from,” said Willingham. “They need to be handled by a professional.”

And the Pizzutos still have lot of work to do. At the top of their downspout near the garage, we found another cluster of bees.  Willingham said that it could take several days to get rid of all the bees, from the garage, to the gutter, to another cluster we saw in the yard.

Hulett Environmental Services ~ Termite Control

Family owned and operated for over 40 years, Hulett provides the friendly, personalized service you expect from a family business while still remaining the leader in the latest pest prevention and control technology. Our services are available all over the State of Florida.

Bed Bug Frequently Asked Questions

Bed Bug Frequently Asked Questions

Bed Bugs in America Survey

From the NPMA’s Bed Bugs in America Survey:

  • One out of five Americans has had a bed bug infestation in their home or knows someone who has encountered bed bugs at home or in a hotel
  • Americans who have encountered bed bugs tend to be younger, live in urban areas and rent their homes. The incidence of bed bugs is three times higher in urban areas than in rural areas due to factors such as larger population size, apartment living and increased mobility, which are conducive to the rapid spread and breeding of bed bugs.
  • Bed bugs are found in all 50 states. Specifically, the pests were encountered by 17 percent of respondents in the Northeast; 20 percent in the Midwest; 20 percent in the South; and 19 percent in the West.
  • Most Americans are concerned about bed bugs and believe that infestations in the United States are increasing. Nearly 80 percent are most concerned about encountering bed bugs at hotels; 52 percent on public transportation; 49 percent in movie theaters; 44 percent in retail stores; 40 percent in medical facilities; 36 percent in their own homes; and 32 percent equally pointed to places of employment and friends’ homes. The fear of getting bitten topped the list of concerns.
  • As the public’s awareness of the bed bug resurgence grows, many Americans are modifying their behaviors to minimize their risk of an infestation: 27 percent have inspected or washed clothing upon returning from a trip; 25 percent have checked a hotel room for bed bugs; 17 percent have inspected or vacuumed a suitcase upon returning from a trip and 12 percent have altered or canceled travel plans because of concern about bed bugs.
  • Sixteen percent of survey respondents inspected second-hand furniture they have brought into their homes; 15 percent have checked dressing rooms when trying on clothing and 29 percent have washed new clothing immediately upon bringing it home from a store.
  • Of the 13 percent of respondents who said they knew someone who had a bed bug infestation in their home, 40 percent said they avoided entering the infested home and 33 percent discouraged those who had the infestation from entering their own home.
  • Despite the availability of information, most Americans still have misconceptions about bed bugs. Nearly half of respondents incorrectly believe that bed bugs transmit disease. However, research conducted to date has shown that bed bugs do not transmit disease to their human victims, although some people may experience itchy, red welts; 29 percent inaccurately believe bed bugs are more common among lower income households, and 37 percent believe bed bugs are attracted to dirty homes.  Bed bugs do not discriminate in regard to household income and are found in both sanitary and unsanitary conditions.

 

Other NPMA Bed Bug Facts:

  • Bed bugs can lay one to five eggs in a day and more than 500 in a lifetime.
  • Bed bugs can survive for seveal months without eating.
  • Bed bugs can withstand a wide range of temperatures, from nearly freezing to 122 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Bed bug draw blood for about five minutes before retreating to digest.
  • Bed bugs hatchlings are so small they can pass through a stitch-hole in a mattress.
  • Bed bugs can ingest seven times their own weight in blood, which would be the equivalent of an average-sized male drinking 120 gallons of liquid.
  • Bed bugs are found in all 50 U.S. states.

Florida Lawn Care

Information on Lawn Pests

AntsLooking for information on lawn pests in Florida? You have found the right place on the web! Most homeowners in Florida take pride in maintaining their gardens and landscapes. But healthy landscapes can bring certain Florida bugs, and these pests feed on plants and grass. Unless protective pest control measures are taken, various outdoor invaders can do extensive damage to your yard and garden.

Chinch bugs are seriously damaging to St Augustine and other turf grass species. They suck the plant juices through their needle-like beak and can also cause other internal injuries to the grass, which can result in yellowish and brown patches in lawns. These affected areas are frequently noticed first along concrete or asphalt-paved edges, or in water-stressed areas where the grass is growing in full sun.

Aphids and whitefly feed on vegetable plantings, ornamentals and tender plant parts such as grass shoots, sucking out essential fluids. Aphids and scale excrete a sweet substance known as honeydew that attracts ants and forms a sticky coating on leaves. The honeydew can form a fungus called “sooty mold,” which can make leaves, especially on ornamentals, look black and dirty. Aphids can also transmit plant viruses to their food plants, which can cause the plant to die. These pests, as well as chinch bugs, are particularly prevalent throughout the spring months.

Armyworms, sod webworms and grubworms eat the grass blades and shoots that make up healthy lawns, causing major damage to various kinds of turf grass. They are common during the fall months.

During fall and winter, mites and scale are common. Scale insects live in the soil and suck the juices from the grass roots of turf grass; they can also be harmful to ornamental plants. Symptoms attributed to scale insects include yellowing of the grass, followed by browning; scale damage becomes most noticeable when the grass is under stress due to drought, nutritional deficiencies and other afflictions. Ordinarily not a pest in well-managed lawns, mites are known to attack grasses. They suck the sap and cause leaves to appear blotched and stippled, and severe infestations can also kill plants.

Some of these pests are especially damaging since they are literally born and raised on lawn turf grass in the surrounding soil. Sod webworms eat various grasses as larvae and continue doing so as adults. Others, like mole crickets, destroy lawns by tunneling through the soil near the lawn’s surface, which loosens the soil so that the grass is often uprooted and dies due to the drying out of the root system. They also feed on grass roots, causing thinning of the turf, eventually resulting in bare soil. Mole crickets are common when the temperatures are the warmest and rainfall and humidity is high. They can also be found in and around your home in dark, damp places.

Slugsandsnails often move about on lawns and may injure adjacent plants. They are night feeders and leave mucous trails on plants and sidewalks. Plaster bagworms, close relatives of the clothes moth, are often found in sheds and garages.

Do you live in Florida and have a lawn pest problem in your landscape? Hulett Environmental Services offers custom designed lawn care treatments to control and prevent these pests!

The Hulett Environmental Daily