Tag Archives: Weather.com: Rough Year For Mosquitoes Ahead

Weather.com: Rough Year For Mosquitoes Ahead

Weather.com: Rough Year For Mosquitoes Ahead

Last year’s drought killed many things, but not mosquitoes. They are still a pesky issue, especially with the recent spring flooding.

“We’ve had large expanses of drought in the past year, weather.com Meteorologist Nick Wiltgen said. “But now that the three-year Georgia drought is over, the only region that has been continuously in drought for two years or more stretches from southeast Arizona through New Mexico to west Texas, and north to southeast Colorado. For other areas, the drought hasn’t lasted as long, at least yet.”

Although last year’s record-breaking drought wrecked havoc on most of the nation, destroying crops, causing water shortages and sweltering temperatures, mosquito eggs were not impacted.

Mosquito eggs are tough enough to take the worst beating from Mother Nature and survive for several years. After the drought ends and the rains return, so do the pesky critters.

Joe Conlon, an entomologist and technical adviser to the American Mosquito Control Association,told USA Today: “They are incredibly complex; they have a plastron (protective surface) and actually have their own atmosphere. Hey, mosquitoes have been around at least 170 million years, and it’s not because they are stupid.”

Recent flooding in the midwest are another cause for concern. Although the flooding has subsided, mosquitoes may be about two weeks away from showing up, according to wlfi.com.

“This past weekend’s rain set us up for a future of inundation with mosquitoes,” University of Georgia Entomologist Dr. Nancy Hinkle told wsbradio.com. “Millions of mosquitoes can develop in less than a cup of water.”

So how can you lessen the impact of mosquitoes? Getting rid of items that hold standing water are key, Hinkle says. For example, cups, cans or tarps in the yard.

According to USA Today, it’s also good to clean your gutters, drain puddles and ditches, change birdbath water weekly, and look for trapped water.

Weather.com wants to help you plan for the season. Check out the  mosquito activity forecast anytime.