9 Killer Insects to Watch Out For

9 Killer Insects to Watch Out For

Usually we hear about all of the deadliest insects coming from Australia or Africa. We consider ourselves pretty safe in the U.S. But, don’t let your guard down just yet. We too have deadly insects that can deliver a fatal blow should we encounter them. They typically spend the winter far away from humans, so we’re relatively safe…for now. Here are nine deadly insects that are native to the U.S.

The Arizona bark scorpion is the only scorpion whose venom can be fatal. If you’re stung by one you can expect to experience numbness, convulsions, and frothing at the mouth. Sounds fun…

Most people are familiar with the black widow spider. But did you know that its venom is fifteen times stronger than a rattlesnakes? Symptoms include chest pain, vomiting, swelling, and fainting.

Brown recluse spiders lurk in the dark, hidden corners of your home. Their bite causes your skin cells to necrotize, and if not treated immediately, can lead to fatal infections and loss of limbs.

Puss caterpillars may look cute and cuddly, but those fuzzy “hairs” are actually spines that can become embedded in your skin and cause an incredibly painful reaction.

Anopheles mosquitos transmit malaria, and many of them are resistant to insecticides.

Kissing bugs transmit the parasite T. cruzi, which causes Chagas disease. Symptoms can include stroke, constipation, and even sudden cardiac arrest.

Wasps actually cause a surprising number of deaths in the U.S. every year. This is mostly because many people are allergic to their sting.

Africanized bees are much more aggressive than their traditional counterpart, and tend to attack in swarms. The sheer number of stings a person can get from one of these swarms is what kills people.

Do you remember learning about the bubonic plague in history class. Well, Oriental rat fleas still carry the bacteria that causes the plague. Catch this bad boy and you can expect symptoms as awful as internal bleeding and seizures.

What do you think of the U.S.’s most dangerous insects? Do they make you afraid to go to sleep at night?

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