Tag Archives: Spiders

Female Spiders Love Single Father Spiders

Female Daddy Long Legs Spiders Love Single Father Daddy Long Legs SpidersWell there is not much monogamy in the spider world, but the look of a male daddy long legs spider standing guard over eggs is irresistible to the females. Apparently the female daddy long legs spider will gravitate towards males that are guarding eggs because it makes them think that he will guard her eggs too.

It does not pay to be a deadbeat dad in the community of daddy long legs. A male that abandons his duty toward protecting the eggs that he helped produce will not be in very high demand as far as mating goes. Male spiders will sometimes give up on looking after its unborn offspring because the male needs to find food. But there are other males who stick around, even as long as four months.

A male spider will continue to mate while he is standing guard over eggs. After a while a male might find itself protecting a bunch of eggs that belong to different mothers. If the male happens to be standing guard in an area that is plentiful with food he will have no reason to leave. Naturally a female prefers this type of male since her offspring will most likely get a chance to prosper as long as they think that the male will not abandon the eggs. This sexual preference, and the behavior associated with it, has been noted in many other animals as well.

Do female mammals consider the likelihood of abandonment when choosing mates? And how?

Why Are Jumping Spider So Intelligent?

Jumping Spider Facts
Jumping Spiders are fascinating creatures. They are not the typical representatives of the arachnid family, and for many reasons. One reason, and perhaps the most well known reason among spider enthusiasts, is their superior eyesight relative to other arachnids. Their eyesight is so acute that it is on par with vertebrats. But they are also unique in that they are surprisingly aggressive for their size. For example the Jumping Spider considers just about any other spider fair game as potential prey. Jumping Spiders serve as predators to other predators. In other words, the jumping spider is so advanced as a spider that it can make a meal out of spiders that are the biggest and most feared killers in the spider world, and this is despite the jumping spiders small size.

It is supposed by researchers that if a Jumping Spider is able to resort to extra cunning in order to attack and eat even bigger spiders, then the jumping spider must be, as a result of a yet to be discovered adaptation, more intelligent than the vast majority of other spiders. So researchers decided to test this hypothesis by constructing a complicated trail that would end in bug parts and other desirable types of food that all spiders can agree are pretty tasty.

The researchers set loose a variety of different arachnids in order to see if any of them were capable of the abstract thought that was necessary to find the food. Of course all the spiders failed to find the end of the trail where the food was waiting for them, except, of course, for the Jumping Spiders. The Jumping Spider was the only spider capable of changing its directory to the path that led to the food. As a result of the experiment researchers are convinced that a Jumping Spider’s brain, despite being as small as a sesame seed, is advanced enough to reason its way to the correct food source in spite of the many tricks that were laid upon its path.

Do you believe that there is a clear correlation between brain size and mental sophistication?

Researchers Effectively Blindfold Spiders in the Name of Science

Have you ever wondered what would happen if you blindfolded a spider?  Well, a team of presumably very bored entomologists at the University of Nebraska have managed to do just that.  However, and to the scientists’ credit, the spider that they managed to somehow blindfold is not just any spider.  The spider in question possesses the largest eyes known to science.  This spider has been named Deinopis Spinosa and is found in Australia, Africa, and the Americas.

This spider hunts prey at night, which could be why this spider has evolved a pair of abnormally large eyes, which, combined, equal eight eyes in total.  A very dedicated biologist was not content with this theory and decided to camp out in the spider’s habitat for a total of eight months to see how it would behave after he blindfolded it with dental silicone.

It turns out that these blindfolded spiders could not catch ground dwelling prey as easily as they could with the use of their eyes, but their ability to catch flying prey remained largely unaffected.  This is likely due to the spiders preferred taste for ground dwelling insects, as they tend to be more nutritious.  Why do I get the idea that this entomologist just really loves camping?

Can you think of an insect that wouldn’t be negatively affected by being blindfolded? How would they adapt to survive without sight?

New Spidey Skill Revealed

New Spidey Skill Revealed

Although they engender fear, spiders are a class of arthropods that are not only helpful to humans, but also possess a host of amazing skills.  The latest research shows that, in addition to web-spinning and poison fangs, these eight-legged wonders have another superpower.

They can, using five different techniques, essentially walk on water.

Having a lot of legs helps in this talent, but mostly it’s body posture and water repellent feet that allow arachnids to negotiate puddles and streams.  Their first method is sailing, which entails moving the whole abdomen upside down so it juts straight into the air.  This way, their main bulk catches the wind and they glide through across waterways.

The second technique takes advantage of spider threads, extruded from the posterior and used to catch the wind.  Research has shown that this method can result in traveling nearly 20 miles in one day.

Anchoring also uses silk, but in this approach the spider uses a strand of web to catch onto the surface of the water.

Speed walking is useful because spider’s feet are water repellent, thus they can scurry over short, watery distances.

Lastly, a spider is able to fake death and go into an absolutely frozen state.  Their feet allow them to glide across moving water without sinking.

Dealing with Dangerous Spiders- What to do if you Spot a

Dealing with Dangerous Spiders: What to do if you Spot a Dangerous Spider in Your Home

Dealing with Dangerous Spiders-670People vary in their opinions and treatment of spiders. Some people hate them with a passion and will smash them on sight. Others live peacefully with whatever spiders decide to explore or even move into their homes. Whatever your reaction to the arachnid may be, it is important to learn how to identify dangerous and/or venomous spiders so that you don’t risk aggravating a creature that could do quite a lot of harm to you if it is mishandled.

How to Identify a Dangerous Spider

Unfortunately, there aren’t any universal identifying marks that will help you quickly figure out whether or not a spider is dangerous. There are some who believe that the brighter the color of a spider, the more threatening it might be to your well-being (the black widow and brown recluse being the exceptions to the rule). Still, color varies between spiders so a spider that should be bright red might be a more muted and brownish hue.

The best way to figure out whether a spider is venomous or dangerous is to learn about the different spiders that live in your area. A taxonomic guide to local spiders will tell you which spiders are harmless and which should be treated with care. Pay particular attention to the characteristics and markings of the spiders that could potentially pose a threat.

What to do When You See a Spider

No matter what type of spider you find exploring your home or come across in the wild, the best thing to do is to tread carefully and approach it slowly. Keep your mouth closed and your eyes covered—goggles, reading glasses, etc are usually adequate. Put on long sleeves and tuck the sleeves into gloves and tuck the legs of your pants into your socks. This way if the spider panics and rushes you, you won’t have to worry too much about it crawling into your clothes.

Note: This is also the best way to dress if you’re going to be spending time in wooded or grassy areas where spiders and other bugs like to live.

The goal is to get close enough to get a good look at the spider without causing it to panic and either rush at you (remember, some spiders jump) or run away. The best way to do this is to capture it.

Capturing a Spider

The best way to capture a spider is to put a solid glass container over it. Then, slowly slide a stiff piece of cardboard across the mouth of the container. Go as slowly as your nerves can handle. This way the spider is more likely to simply crawl up onto the cardboard and won’t try to escape under it, and you don’t risk squishing it or breaking some of its legs.

Should You Kill the Spider?

Once you’ve captured and secured the spider, you can kill it if you want to, but don’t smash it. The Smithsonian recommends putting the sealed container in the freezer so that it will go into a natural hibernation state and then, the next morning, submerge it in rubbing alcohol.

This accomplishes two goals: it kills the spider in a humane way that doesn’t torture it. It also leaves the spider intact so you can take it to a pest control expert or entomologist for identification. If the spider does turn out to be venomous or dangerous, you should take steps to prevent more of its kind from checking out your living space.

Dealing with a Spider Infestation

If the spider population has gotten out of control in spite of your better efforts, it’s worth hiring a pest control expert to help you eradicate your arachnid roommates. The best approach is an environmentally responsible one. You don’t want to risk harming other, wanted occupants of the house or that might hang out in your yard. Don’t try to take on an infestation yourself. You could do more harm than good!