Hulett Response to Coronavirus. Read Here

GET STARTED

Lone Star Ticks

Active Seasons

Illustration representing the spring season
Illustration representing the summer season
Illustration representing the winter season
Illustration representing the fall season

Appearance and Size Facts

  • Lone Star ticks are Hard ticks that are brown in color
  • Long legs and long mouthparts
  • Adults exhibit sexual dimorphism - males are brown with a variation of white markings around the margin of the body, while females are brown with a silver to white colored spot in the middle of the scutum (shield covering the top part of the back)
  • Males also have a scutum that covers nearly the entire top of the body, while females have a scutum that cover roughly half of the body
  • Size: Adults are roughly 1/9 to 1/6 inch in length when unfed

Behavior and Habitat of Lone Star Ticks

Lone Star ticks are three-host feeders, meaning that a host is fed during the larval, nymphal, and adult life stages, between molting. Although different hosts are fed upon, Lone Star ticks are, in general, aggressive and generalist feeders in all stages. Larval ticks prefer birds and smaller mammals, while nymphal ticks and adult ticks prefer small mammals or rodents and medium to large sized mammals, respectively. After the female feeds in the adult stage, she will begin depositing roughly 5,000 eggs in the soil. Once eggs hatch, larvae go through a resting period and then begin searching for a host through questing. Seasonality peaks at different times throughout different areas of the country, although the warmer climate of Florida may support year-round activity of Lone Star ticks. Lone Star ticks can be found on the east coast of the United States, from Maine to Florida, and as far west as Texas, north to Iowa and Nebraska. Lone Star ticks are usually found in heavily wooded areas, especially in areas with heavy underbrush that also have populations of white-tailed deer.

Image of a magnifying glass

Signs of Infestation of Lone Star Ticks

Lone Star ticks cause many different types of diseases, including STARI (Southern Tick-Associated Rash Illness), Human Monocytotropic Ehrlichiosis, Tularemia, Rickettsiosis, and more recently, the Heartland Virus. Although causative agent for Lyme Disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, has been isolated from a small sample of Lone Star ticks, research in 2005 has shown that these ticks are highly incapable of transmitting the disease.

An illustration representing a warning sign for bug infestation

Tips for Prevention of Lone Star Ticks

Removal of heavy underbrush and tall grasses may help to reduce Lone Star tick populations. Wearing a repellent product on clothing and skin may help to prevent tick questing, and is considered the best prevention by the Centers for Disease Control. Wearing light colored clothing, inspecting clothing and shoes, inspecting pets, inspecting your body, and showering after being in tick-prone areas are all recommended for prevention. Using a prescription or over-the-counter acaricide for dogs and cats can also help to reduce tick populations. Before using an acaricide, consult a veterinarian before choosing a particular product. If bitten by a tick, the tick should be removed using forceps rather than your fingers, and should be removed slowly, using a straight, pulling motion. Be careful to remove all portions of the mouthparts, as they are covered in backward-facing spines to help keep the tick attached to the host. After removing the tick, wash the area thoroughly and keep a watchful eye for post-removal infections.

A cropped image of a pencil

Lone Star Tick Gallery

Photograph of lone star tick
Photograph of lone star tick number 2
Photograph of lone star tick number 3

Latest Pest & Termite Control News

The Signs of Mosquito Breeding Grounds

The Signs of Mosquito Breeding Grounds

In Florida, mosquitoes are a year-round problem, but the summertime is when Floridians struggle most with these bloodsucking pests. Mosquitoes like warm weather, so Florida is just as much a paradise for them as it is for humans. In the summer, Floridians enjoy backyard activities like cookouts,...

Read More ›
Mosquito Reduction in your Yard: Effective Outdoor Mosquito Control Methods

Mosquito Reduction in your Yard: Effective Outdoor Mosquito Control Methods

Mosquito control has many methods that together will deliver the best reduction again mosquito bites for the yard. Backyard mosquito control is a major concern for those who want to enjoy their yards and pool without the nuisance of mosquitoes buzzing in their ears and biting them. More than a...

Read More ›
Termites 101: A South Florida Homeowners Guide

Termites 101: A South Florida Homeowners Guide

South Florida is an attractive place to call home. It's no wonder termites also love West Palm Beach, Miami, Fort Lauderdale, Naples, Fort Myers, Fort Pierce and other South Florida neighborhoods. In fact, termites are predicted to damage over 50% of South Florida structures by 2040, according to...

Read More ›