Hulett Response to Coronavirus. Read Here

GET STARTED

Mole Crickets

Active Seasons

Illustration representing the spring season
Illustration representing the summer season
Illustration representing the winter season
Illustration representing the fall season

Appearance and Size Facts

  • Thick-bodied insects with large beady eyes and shovel-like forelimbs
  • Highly developed for burrowing and swimming
  • Brown, tan, or reddish-brown in color
  • Adult Mole cricket may fly as far as 5 miles during mating season and is active most of the year
  • Size: Approximately 1 to 2 inches in length

Behavior and Habitat of Mole Crickets

Mole crickets are serious pests of lawns, and they are prevalent throughout South Florida. They are recognized by their large, shovel-like front legs that resemble those of moles. Adult Mole crickets can fly and are attracted to exterior lights. Mole crickets are relatively common, but because they are nocturnal and spend nearly all their lives underground in extensive tunnel systems they are rarely seen. They inhabit agricultural fields, rice paddies, lawns, and golf courses. Five out of the seven species present in North America are immigrants from Europe, Asia, and South America, and are commonly considered pests.

Image of a magnifying glass

Signs of Infestation of Mole Crickets

Mole crickets can damage plants by feeding at night on aboveground foliage or stem tissue and belowground on roots and tubers. Seedlings may be girdled at the stems near the soil surface, though some plants may be completely severed and pulled into a tunnel to be eaten. Mole cricket tunneling near the soil surface dislodges plants or causes them to dry out. Tunneling reduces the aesthetic quality of turfgrass, interferes with the roll of the ball on golf courses, and results in reduced livestock grazing on severely infested pastures.

An illustration representing a warning sign for bug infestation

Tips for Prevention of Mole Crickets

Ensure that irrigation is sufficient to allow for proper turf root zone uptake, but still allowing the soil to dry out completely after watering will help to mitigate Mole cricket activity.

A cropped image of a pencil

Mole Cricket Gallery

Photograph of mole cricket
Photograph of mole cricket number 2
Photograph of mole cricket number 3
Photograph of mole cricket number 4

Latest Pest & Termite Control News

South Florida Ant Spotlight #2: White Footed and Big Headed Ants

South Florida Ant Spotlight #2: White Footed and Big Headed Ants

Florida has its fair share of ant pests, such as the White Footed Ant and the Big Headed Ant. These invasive species are widespread here in South Florida. After invading, these exotic ants have thrived throughout Florida and pose a danger to native ants. A nuisance for homeowners, these invasive...

Read More ›
The Signs of Mosquito Breeding Grounds

The Signs of Mosquito Breeding Grounds

In Florida, mosquitoes are a year-round problem, but the summertime is when Floridians struggle most with these bloodsucking pests. Mosquitoes like warm weather, so Florida is just as much a paradise for them as it is for humans. In the summer, Floridians enjoy backyard activities like cookouts,...

Read More ›
Mosquito Reduction in your Yard: Effective Outdoor Mosquito Control Methods

Mosquito Reduction in your Yard: Effective Outdoor Mosquito Control Methods

Mosquito control has many methods that together will deliver the best reduction again mosquito bites for the yard. Backyard mosquito control is a major concern for those who want to enjoy their yards and pool without the nuisance of mosquitoes buzzing in their ears and biting them. More than a...

Read More ›